Cazenovia Park in the Fall

Cazenovia Park in the Fall

If you are a regular reader of the blog, you know that my husband Tim and I are both bikers, as in cyclists. In the summer, we ride four or five days a week. We have ridden through Cazenovia (Caz) Park several times. The last time, Tim suggested I write about it. I said what I always say, “I’ll put it on the list.” And I did. Full disclosure, my list is now pages long with something like 80 ideas waiting to be written.

A couple of weeks ago, I heard it was peak time to see fall colors in Buffalo. So I struck out for Caz Park to see what I could see. I admit, I am not very familiar with the park except for those bike rides through it on Warren Spahn Way, and a couple of road (running) races. But this day I drove over and parked at the Shelter House to get a closer look. I see things more clearly on foot.

A Bit of History, of Course

Let’s start with a bit of the history of Buffalo’s Parks and Parkway System.

In the mid 1800s, Buffalo was booming. We were growing as fast as a city could at the time. Commerce flourished along the waterfront with shipping, railroads, cattle, grain and all the smaller industries that supported these giants. Buffalo had money, and by 1860, city leaders wanted to create a park similar to Frederick Law Olmsted’s Central Park in New York City. So, they brought Olmsted to Buffalo to design our own Central Park.

Frederick Law Olmsted

After touring the city through its radial streets design, laid out by Joseph Ellicott in 1804, Olmsted declared Buffalo to be “the best planned city, as to streets, public places, and grounds, in the United States, if not in the world.”* He then proceeded to improve upon it, by proposing and creating a park system to compliment the already beautifully designed city we call home. It would become the first park system in the United States, where the parks are connected through a series of parkways, giving the illusion that, when travelling from one to another, you haven’t left the park.

Take a walk down the center of Lincoln, Bidwell or Chapin Parkways to get that feeling. It’s real. Olmsted knew what he was doing. He is perhaps the greatest landscape architect our country has ever seen, even now.

Caz Park

Cazenovia Park and South Park were designed to serve the rapidly growing neighborhood that came to be known as South Buffalo. You know the place. These parks were to become part of the elaborate park system I mentioned just a moment ago.

Plan of Cazenovia Park, Olmsted, Olmsted & Elliot
Photo courtesy of UB University Libraries

Caz Park was built between 1892 and 1894, by Olmsted, Olmsted & Eliot, including Frederick Law’s son, John. It sits on an 83 acre site roughly bounded by Abbott Road, Cazenovia Street, Potters Road and Seneca Street. Cazenovia Creek ran through the park, and was dammed to create a 20 acre lake near the Cazenovia Street/Abbott Road area. This was news to me. And it made me think. It’s an 83 acre park, so that means the lake took up just about a quarter of the whole park.

Wish I could have seen it. Apparently it was a popular spot for canoeing and boating in summers as well as ice skating in the winter. Which I could totally see. I get that it’s a safety thing, but I wish skating was allowed in the parks again. I suppose we have skating at Rotary Rink and Canalside. Which is fun, but it doesn’t seem quite the same as gliding out onto a lake, or even a creek.

What would we have to do to bring this back? Hmmmm. Not holding my breath.

Let’s Continue

In 1902, the Shelter House was built to accommodate the boaters and skaters. And for that matter the picnickers too, because this was becoming the place to be evenings and weekends in South Buffalo. The Shelter House was smaller than Olmsted had originally designed it, but where else do you see public restrooms like these, except in an Olmsted park? They’re amazing.

The Casino

In 1912, funds were available, and the Casino was built. The architectural firm of Esenwein & Johnson was chosen to design it. The firm was well known, and quite popular in Buffalo, having designed many buildings and homes here, including the Temple of Music at the Pan Am Exposition, the Niagara Mohawk Building, the Elephant House at the Buffalo Zoo, the Calumet Building, and more.

This view of the casino today is from the opposite side of the lake (when it was still there.)

The casino was located right along the lake and the lower (basement) level had room for 100 boats and canoes, both private and rentals. There were restrooms, an ice cream shop and a candy counter, with plenty of seating both inside and out on the expansive patios overlooking the lake. The upper floor was used for offices and storage. Must have been something back in the day when the lake was still there, sitting out on the patio sipping a cool lemonade on a hot summer day, watching the boaters. Or hot cocoa in the winter after skating.

Photo credit: Pinterest

The casino is still there, and the views are absolutely lovely today of a meadow with plenty of trees, a playground for kids, baseball diamonds and the creek off in the distance.

What Happened to the Lake?

Because the lake was created by damming the creek, there were all sorts of drainage issues throughout its history. Silt built up often in the (only) 4 -6 feet deep lake, and flooding occurred many times. Over the years, the lake was dredged and redesigned in the hopes that the flooding issue would be rectified, but it was no good.

Photo credit: Pinterest

The lake was eventually removed. I’ll add that I’ve read many different versions of when it was finally removed. I guess there was a small lagoon area that was created during one of the redesigns that was there until 1969 or so, but most of the lake was gone in the 1950s. I won’t quibble about the exact date, because it’s pretty clear that it was completely gone by 1970. It’s sad that they couldn’t make it work, but you can’t fight Mother Nature. She always wins in the end.

On a Personal Note

My Dad recently told me a story about asking his father to drive him out to Caz Park to do some fishing. He was about 12 years old and had heard the fish were biting. He asked to be dropped off and then picked up three hours later. Normally, he’d have ridden his bike, but it was March and was snowy. My father grew up on the East Side, and rode his bike all over Western New York as a 10 or 12 year old, to fish. Including to a lake out in Clarence. And once he rode to Chautauqua Lake without telling his parents where he was going. But that’s another story for another day.

So my Gramps dropped Dad off at Caz Creek in the park. He was absolutely freezing by the time he got picked up, three hours later. Apparently, the casino was closed that day. When I asked if he caught anything, he replied, “Oh yeah, we ate fish for supper that night, but I don’t remember what kind or how many, I just remember how cold I was.” This was a kid who delivered 120 newspapers every morning, and more on the weekends, so he was no stranger to being out in the cold. But that memory sticks out in his mind about Cazenovia Creek to this day.

More Recently

Today, the park is chock full of amenities. There are baseball diamonds, tennis courts, basketball courts, soccer fields, a playground, a splash pad, a community center, complete with a swimming pool, an indoor ice rink, and a senior center. Oh, and a golf course! There is also a neighborhood library on the grounds, although it’s temporarily closed. And let us not forget the numerous events that would be taking place throughout the year, if it weren’t for covid. (When will I get to write a post that doesn’t include that word?)

And the foot paths. They are used daily by South Buffalonians of all ages. There are always people walking here. With their dogs. Alone. In pairs or small groups. And why not? It’s a beautiful park, with gorgeous, old trees chosen and placed, quite possibly by Olmsted himself. And It’s what I did on this crisp, sunny day at the end of November.

This is Tara, who walks here everyday with her favorite human, Bill.

The Shelter House was renamed in 2016 for Robert B. Williams, a former professional baseball player, and longtime Buffalo cop. He also coached and mentored thousands of children while active in the Buffalo Police Athletic League. Very cool.

My Impressions

I am so happy I ‘got to know’ Caz Park. And there is more to see! I’m going to make it a point to get out here in all four seasons to really get to know this park. The foot (bike) paths are just lovely, with lots to see, including wildlife. There are a lot of trees in the park, both old and new. That’s always a good thing. And some of the old ones, boy, are they ever beautiful.

Here’s a lovely new tree.

Here’s something I couldn’t help but notice while walking around the park. The park is residential in several areas. Meaning that there are homes that face the park, on Potters Road, Cazenovia Street and more. And guess what? They’re not million dollar mansions like the homes that line Nottingham Terrace, or Rumsey Road. That hits me like a breath of fresh air. They’re great homes to be sure. I might have to return to get some photos on a street or two, and write a post…yes, I think I will. I’ll put it on the list. You know, that list that’s got 89 (I went back and counted) ideas on it, haha!

What Else?

This park is steeped in history. While walking around, I couldn’t help but wonder about the many, many people who have come before me. What were they like? Did they freeze here in the winter like my Dad did? Did they score the winning goal at a soccer game, or basketball game? Or did their team win the softball championship in 1976?

Or was this the place to come on Sundays in your horse drawn carriage around the turn of the 20th century? With a picnic basket, filled with whatever was popular picnic fare back then? Possibly sitting out on the terrace overlooking the lake?

Who were these Buffalonians? What were they like? Were they happy? Were they kind?

When, oh when, will time travel be a thing? I will be first in line. I’d like to see Buffalo during its heyday. I’d like to see this park in 1915. And not as a woman of Polish/Irish descent who would have worked in service, but as the daughter of very educated parents, who happened to be very successful, and wealthy. Haha!

This place incites daydreams in me. I will definitely be back. And soon. I love walking in the snow…

Get the Book! Click below for a preview!

They make great keepsakes, or gifts for family and friends (or yourself!).  Click here or on the photo below to purchase yours!

*The Best Planned City in the World: Olmsted, Vaux, and the Buffalo Park System (Designing the American Park) Hardcover – June 7, 2013. by Francis R. Kowsky

Circle Living – Soldiers Circle

Circle Living – Soldiers Circle

I’ve been admiring Soldiers Circle, or Soldiers Place, since well, I guess since the first time I really noticed it. I used to work for the Government of Canada here in Buffalo, and the Consul General’s official residence was on Soldiers Circle. The Canadians purchased the mansion in 2009. There would be parties held there on occasion and I remember it being a beautiful home that was surrounded by other beautiful homes.

For some odd reason, I never really noticed this circle before that time. I mean, I had driven through it many times. But after the first party at #196, I started extending my walks in Delaware Park to include Lincoln Parkway and Soldiers Circle. We are so fortunate to have so much gorgeous architecture to look at on our daily walks. And to be fair, this circle is wide. Might be why I never noticed the homes until I went in one. What I mean is that the homes are a good distance from the circle itself, with lots of green space and trees in between. And when you’re driving or biking through, you really have to pay attention to traffic.

Let’s get to it.

 

On this particular walk I met Auggie, who lives on Inwood, but walks the circle on his daily constitutionals! So cute!

 

A Bit of History at Soldiers Circle

 

When Frederick Law Olmsted designed our parkway system, he put Soldiers Circle at the center of the three main parkways, Lincoln, Bidwell and Chapin. These three parkways lead to all the others, which lead us to all the other parks. Sadly, not all the others have survived. But we’re not here to discuss that today.

Today, it’s all about the circle itself. Originally, Soldiers Circle was meant to be home to the Soldiers and Sailors Monument which ended up being placed downtown in Lafayette Square. History isn’t clear how or why that happened, but here we are. Instead the circle originally had three Navy Parrot Guns, which were Civil War cannons, and stacks of cannonballs.

Word on the street says that from the beginning, Buffalonians couldn’t resist stealing the cannonballs. I guess some sold them for scrap, some sold them to collectors, and some simply kept them. Still others would roll them up and down the parkways. Oh, Buffalo…

 

Photo Credit: New York Heritage Digital Collections – Olmsted Parks Conservancy

 

Either way, all of it was removed in 1937 by then Parks Commissioner Frank Coon, who said they were traffic hazards. Apparently, more than once, people ran their vehicles into the cannons. (Was this a precursor to people driving into buildings in Buffalo?) Seriously though, this is not the first time I’ve heard that early drivers had trouble maneuvering through traffic circles. Anyway, and ironically, the cannons and their accompanying cannonballs were sold for junk at that time.

 

The Homes on Soldiers Circle

 

I headed over to Soldiers Circle on an absolutely beautiful October day. The sun was shining, the sky could have been a bit more blue, but it was a crisp, pretty, autumn day nonetheless.

 

 

I entered the circle at Chapin Parkway heading towards Bidwell. The first thing I see is this building (above) that was originally a hotel, built for the Pan American Exposition in 1901. It’s since been turned into townhouses and apartments. I’ve seen photos of the interior of a couple of the townhouses and they’re beautiful!

I’m not sure what’s going on with the brick though. I doubt it was originally a mix of yellow and red, which shows at some point there was at least some neglect, but it appears to be well maintained now. I love that almost every window still has the original leaded glass transoms above. And there are so many windows!

On this particular day, I noticed a lot of things I’ve never noticed about this building before. Like what are those openings in the peaks? Are they patios? If they are, how lovely! And I love the transoms and sidelights at the main entryways! Gorgeous!

 

 

The Oldest Home on the Circle

 

The very next house I come to I meet the owner on his way out with his dog. He tells me his is the oldest home on the circle. It’s an 1885 Eastlake Victorian, and I daresay it’s one of the nicest examples of the style I’ve seen.

An Eastlake Victorian differs from other Victorians, from what I understand, by the ornamentation. Named for Charles Locke Eastlake, the Eastlake style home has more subdued ornamentation than other Victorians. Charles disdained flamboyant decoration, and it showed in his designs. The use of color is more subdued as well. In this case it makes for a gorgeous home. To my eye, the colors are spot on, and the ornamentation is a perfect compliment to the home. The windows are original and open out from the bottom, see photo. I find the whole house to be very charming. I’d love to see the inside.

But alas the owner and his super cute Labradoodle have already left for places unknown.

 

 

Am I in Allentown?

 

This whole section here has a real Allentown feel. It’s quite different from the other ‘sections’ of the circle. Now that I think about it, each section of this circle has its own distinct feel. You’ll see what I mean as I move along.

This one is Allentown. Lovely homes that have a real comfortable feel. Like that feeling I get in Allentown. Look at this house below. Doesn’t it just look comfortable? Like you want to be on that second floor porch reading away the afternoon. Or sipping wine with friends into the late hours on a summer evening. How about that? Sound good? You know it does.

Yes, this section is gorgeous and unpretentious.

 

 

Update 3/14/2024

I received an email this morning from James Gardner Barnard, whose great-great-grandparents lived in the home below at #5 Soldier’s Circle.  His great-great-grandfather was also an early amateur photographer, and took a photo of the home sometime around 1900.  See below. 

Although it’s been awhile since I’ve written a post, I still regularly hear from readers, and I am always thrilled when I do.  James is working on his ancestry, and found this post while trying to figure out if the home still stood, and if the black and white photo he had, was indeed the one that stood on Soldiers Circle.  I’m so happy to have connected the dots for this reader.  And thank you James, for allowing me to write this update and include your ancestor’s photo.

 

 

Photo credit: Freeman Worthington Butts, circa (about) 1900

 

 

Lipke House, Jody Douglass House, & Niscah House

 

Next I came to one of several homes in this area that Buffalo Seminary owns. Most of the homes are used to board students, but a couple are home to Head of School, Assistant Head of School and the like. Pictured below, are three in this stretch owned by Buff Sem. They are Lipke House, Jody Douglass House, and Niscah House.

For clarity, Buffalo Seminary is a non-denominational, day and boarding school for college bound girls. It has its roots in early Buffalo history (1851), and is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning for females in the country.

First up, Lipke House (1896). This one is home to the current Assistant Head of School. What a great example of the Colonial Revival Style. Just look at those four pedimented dormers complete with dentil moldings. Also, notice what is called pebbled dash inside the triangular section of the dormer. I don’t believe those would have originally been painted, but I can’t say for sure in this case. Most were simply mortar with medium size ‘pebbles’ placed at irregular intervals throughout. Interesting!

 

 

Next, are Jody Douglass House (1905) and Niscah House (1910), respectively. Both are for students boarding with Buff Sem. Indeed, as I came upon them, a handful of teenage girls came out of the houses, and headed over to the school. What an idyllic setting for this school. It helps that all of their buildings are incredibly well maintained.

The building below the two houses is Buff Sems’ West Chester Hall. It faces Soldiers Circle. Another beauty and it’s perfectly maintained.

 

 

As I Cross Bidwell Parkway

 

As I cross Bidwell, I get distracted by a house I see, and I’m not sure whether it’s on Bidwell or Soldiers Circle. So I walk up to it, and I find it’s not either. Check it out.

First of all, this is one of the best gates I’ve ever seen! It’s awesome! Second, note the address above the door. Lincoln Woods? It’s then that I remember seeing a small lane off Bidwell Parkway on a map several weeks ago. I make a left to see if I can find it.

 

 

I pass this…another home with a Lincoln Woods address.

 

 

Sure enough, there it is…

 

 

So, even though it appears private, it doesn’t say so. I make a right and I start walking up Lincoln Woods Lane. I don’t go far, out of respect, and because of the fact that there is no city street sign. In fact, there’s a concrete driveway out onto Bidwell. This is what I’m thinking as I take photos of one more Lincoln Woods Lane home.

 

 

It was at that point that I felt like I was intruding on people’s privacy, and I always try to respect that, so that’s as far as I went. When I came home, I looked at a map. There’s at least two more homes back in there. Maybe more. Secrets off Bidwell. Well, I guess it’s not really a secret. I mean, there’s a sign there announcing it! The things you notice when you’re walking!

 

Back to Soldiers Circle

 

As I head back into Soldiers Circle, these are the homes I see. All lovely. A bit newer than I expected, (1960-ish) but just lovely. The backyards of these homes are on Lincoln Woods Lane. Nice.

 

 

 

 

And Then, There’s This

 

Yep. Frank Lloyd Wright is represented on Soldiers Place with this stunner! This home was built for William Heath, who, like Darwin Martin, worked for the Larkin Company. Heath was an office manager, and eventually a vice-president, and was able to engage Frank Lloyd Wright to build this home on Soldiers Place at Bird Ave.

 

 

Here’s what I know about it. Like Darwin Martin’s house, it was built in 1905. It’s one of Wright’s Prairie School designs, shaped to fit on this narrow, long lot. Wright achieved privacy for the Heaths by building up the lot so that the first floor windows are above street level. Indeed, when you walk by, you cannot see inside the home. But still, it draws your attention to the art glass windows, the low slung, hipped roof with projecting eaves, that large, private porch, and just the sheer perfection that this home is.

 

Photo Credit to: Ernst Wasmuth, 1911

 

There is an apartment above the 5+ car garage that has the sweetest second floor patio you can imagine. You know how I love a second floor patio. The home itself is still a private, single family residence, with the exception of that apartment above the garage. This home adds a lot to the appearance and ambience of the circle.

And it’s unique that a Frank Lloyd Wright home sits on a Frederick Law Olmsted designed traffic circle. We are fortunate to have such an amazing design among our Buffalo homes, on one of our historic parkways.

 

 

The Other Side of Bird Ave.

 

As I cross Bird Ave, this is what I see. I don’t even know where to begin! This house is just so – pretty. It’s in impeccable shape. While I’m snapping photos, the owner comes out with his morning coffee and a newspaper. We start to talk and I tell him how much I admire his home.

The symmetry of this Georgian style home is what does it for me. I’m an admirer of symmetry. When things don’t match up, I get uneasy. Not really, but when they do, it pleases me. The bay windows on the Bird Ave side of the house are perfect, and the Palladian windows both on the front and the sides of the house are spectacular. And that entryway! Classic!

 

 

If I have one criticism of this house it would be lack of access to the front porch from the outside. It’s one of my pet peeves. I understand why people do it. Especially on property such as this, where the home faces a circle. But it’s somehow, unneighborly. That being said, the owner was very friendly and willing to chat for a few minutes. And to be fair, he did not build the porch. So, please understand that I mean no disrespect to him. I still love the house regardless, save for that one thing.

 

Two More Homes on This Stretch

 

This slice of Soldiers Circle is set up a little bit differently. Instead of facing the circle on an angle, the homes all face what would be the continuation of Lincoln Parkway, and are stepped somewhat. In the photo below, to the left you can see the previous home set back somewhat from this home, placed further away from Lincoln Parkway. And the next one to come is closer still to the Parkway. The feeling here is one of privacy, and peace.

So, there are just three homes in this section.

This one welcomes you right up to the front door.

 

 

I love the use of Flemish brick bonding on this home. It’s a way of arranging the bricks in each row so that the bricks alternate which side of the brick itself faces the outside. With one being laid the long way, and the next is laid the short way. In the case of this house, a darker brick is used for the bricks with the short end facing out. I love the effect. In fact, all three homes on this section of the circle use this technique of Flemish bonding. It’s fabulous on this particular home.

I also love the entryway. It’s simple, but stately and elegant. The leaded glass sidelights are perfect for this house. And finally, the use of black paint really allows the architectural details to pop. Love it. Why isn’t that done more often?

 

 

And then there’s this one, below. I love how the front walk curves out to the common sidewalk. I admit I wanted to walk up it. Love the brick pavers. The landscaping is beautiful, if a little overgrown at this point in the year. Understandable.

And the house itself. To me it’s a unique design that has great arts and crafts details. The hipped roof with wide, un-enclosed eaves, the exposed roof rafters (these may be decorative). And the rounded porch with its exposed beams and square columns. Love the whole effect.

I picture this as a family home. Unassuming and well lived in. Just as a home should be.

 

 

Moving Right Along

 

As I cross Lincoln Parkway, I notice that this section of the circle is the only one with a separate road on the circle side of the homes. Convenient, if a little less private I guess. Google Maps calls it Soldiers Place. And all the addresses of the homes on the circle are listed at “Soldiers Place”. I should take a moment right now to say that Soldiers Circle is sometimes called Soldiers Place, Soldiers Way and Soldiers Walk. I have no explanation or reasoning for this, except that in Buffalo, we tend to call things whatever we want, and sometimes we end up with a little confusion. This is one of those times.

Getting back to the homes on the circle, check this out. This home is of the American Renaissance Style, and it’s one I’m not very familiar with. It appears to be a precursor to the Arts & Crafts movement. This particular home has that central dormer with a hipped roof, the terracotta, keystone lintels at the windows and the Doric columns on the offset porch. The wrought iron on the upper patio is fantastic! Right down to the landscaping, this home is perfect. To me anyway.

 

 

As I move to the next home, this is what I see (below). It’s official. I’m a fan of the Tudor style. I don’t know why I ever thought I wasn’t. Going out on a limb in this election year, and changing my mind. I like Tudors. Especially this Tudor Revival. It features half timbering over shingles, and a brick first level. Love the chimney.

It was built in 1906 for Albert de La Plante and his wife Margaret, who came to Buffalo from Canada in 1898. Albert worked for Twin Cities Lumber Company. Their son Walter, was Treasurer and Manager of the Peace Bridge later on. Cool! As far as I know they were the first Canadians to live on the circle. But not the last.

 

 

Did Someone Say Statler?

 

Then, suddenly and without warning I’m looking at a 1961 Cape Cod Ranch (below). Here’s another style I wouldn’t have known offhand. Apparently the pitched roof elevation and dormer windows are typical of the Cape Cod style, while the horizontal lines, and large windows lend themselves to the ranch style. Hence, a blending of the two. I never knew ‘Cape Cod Ranch’ was a thing.

This home was built on part of the property previously occupied by the estate of Ellsworth Statler. There is a low-slung wall on the far right of this photo that still exists from the Statler era, and the Medina Sandstone paving was reclaimed from elsewhere on the property. While I inwardly mourn the loss of the Statler house, I absolutely love the look of this home. I think it’s a nice compliment to the more modern homes on the opposite side of the circle.

 

 

The Last Section of the Circle

 

As I cross Bird Ave (again), I see this beauty. I love the symmetry here. The three dormers with broken pediments are lovely. I wish the windows were original, but I fear that they are not. Note the curved arches above the windows, and the keystones. I love when a second floor window copies the front entryway door with its sidelights, like this one does with a smaller version of the surround. I also love, love, love this porch. The curved roofline is just so nice to look at! It softens the rest of the straight lines of this house. Lovely.

 

 

And these two. I love the wrought iron on the front door and sidelights of the first house. And the one below that, is just beautifully built. It appears perfect in every way, with the exception of the complete lack of landscaping. It strikes me as odd in this neighborhood. I’d love it if the walls could talk in this house, because I wonder what’s going on inside.

 

 

 

The Government of Canada on Soldiers Circle

 

Like I mentioned earlier, the Canadians purchased this mansion on Soldiers Circle in 2009. I say the Canadians purchased the property because the Consul General at the time, Marta Moszczenska, always said that the home did not belong to her, but to the people of Canada and their locally engaged staff.

 

This one needs landscaping too, but it’s obviously being worked on.

 

Here’s a funny story. A friend of mine was at the home for a holiday party. While at the party she spilled red wine on white carpeting in an upper hallway. She was mortified and didn’t mention it that night. But by the following Monday, she felt so bad about it, she went to Marta’s office to confess. True to her word, Marta told her not to worry, that it didn’t bother her in the least, and that she would take care of it. It was, after all, not her home. She was only the caretaker. By the end of the conversation, they had made arrangements for the wine spiller to house-sit the following week. That, in a nutshell, what it was like to work for the Government of Canada here in Buffalo.

 

Let’s Take a Look at the Interior

 

Elizabeth and Stephen Hays now own the home, and they were gracious enough to invite me inside and into the backyard. My memory was correct. It’s a beautiful home that’s got great flow from the front foyer all the way around the interior and back again. It’s spectacular!

 

I thought perhaps that over the years, I had built the home up in my mind to be something more than it really is. But no, it’s genuinely a great home. It’s got wide open rooms that are great for big gatherings, and small little nooks to hide away and read a book in peace.

Liz and Stephen have five children and I have to tell you that I like that a large, busy, fun-loving family now fills these rooms. It’s what big homes should be about. Where nobody cares (too much) if you leave a blanket and pillow on the floor. Or forget to pick up your socks. Basically, who cares if someone actually sees that people live here? That attitude seems alive and well here. And I love it. Here’s the family.

 

The Hays Family. Photo Credit: Shaw Photography Co.

 

The Backyard

 

Oh the parties I could give in this backyard. Just sayin. Only thing that bothers me here is all the utility wires criss-crossing it. Sort of annoying in the yard of a mansion. I’m sure that could be remedied though.

 

 

My Impressions

 

I hardly know where to begin with my impressions this week. From the history of this circle including Frederick Law Olmsted, to Frank Lloyd Wright himself, to the Government of Canada, this circle has so much going on.

 

 

Between the three circles I’ve written about now, Soldiers Circle, Symphony Circle and Colonial Circle, this one by far feels the most affluent. Most of the homes are mansions. But there are also the humble Eastlake Victorian, the 1960s Capes and the smaller homes on Lincoln Woods Lane, which are probably larger than they appear.

This circle is also the only one surrounded by Parkways, and that makes it feel affluent as well. Right in the middle of Lincoln Parkway, Bidwell Parkway and Chapin Parkway. Three of the most sought after addresses in the city.

 

 

And Soldiers Circle takes up a lot of real estate. Seriously. From the circle itself, it’s difficult to see any of the homes lining it. I both like that, and don’t like that. Know what I mean? It does make it park like for the homeowners.

 

 

And to be fair the sidewalks do run pretty close to the homes. So, I guess Soldiers Circle, or whatever you prefer to call it, makes a great argument for urban hiking. If you want to see stuff, get out and walk. But isn’t that what I always say?

Take a walk over at Soldiers Circle. You’ll love what you see just like I did!

 

*Get the book! They make great keepsakes, or gifts for friends and family. Click this link to order, or click on the photo below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Special thanks to Elizabeth and Stephen Hays for sharing your home with us! Follow Liz on Instagram @lovelizhays

***All photos in this post are mine, unless otherwise noted.

 

 

Amherst State Park – A True Hidden Gem

Amherst State Park – A True Hidden Gem

Several years back now, my parents were looking in to senior housing. There were some new builds going up adjacent to Amherst State Park that they went to take a look at. A few days later my Mother and I were going somewhere, and we made a slight detour to drive through the parking lot just so I could see the place. They had already decided they didn’t want to move there, but I was (of course) curious anyway.

When we pulled into the lot, I said, “What is this place?” My Mom explained that the new, and at the time, incomplete buildings off to the right hand side, were what they had looked into. But the other, older building straight ahead is what I was interested in. She went on to say that that building used to be the Motherhouse for the Sisters of St. Francis. But that now there was a state park on most of the grounds of the convent.

A state park? What? In Amherst? Just a stone’s throw from Main Street in Williamsville? Yep.

Best kept secret, ever. At least to me.

It’s been a long time coming, but I finally made it over to the park several weeks ago for one of our quarantine hikes. Great decision, it’s a sweet find.

St. Mary of the Angels Convent

My fascination with old buildings immediately drew me to the old convent. Of which I had already done a little bit of research.

Before I knew this building was designed by Deitel & Wade, it reminded me of city hall, in that everywhere you look, you notice all these little details.

I learned that it’s Gothic Revival style is pretty common among convents, and was designed by Deitel and Wade. The same architects who designed our own city hall. At around the same time too – 1928 for this building. 1929 – 32 for City Hall. This building is impressive.

The Sisters

Most of the Franciscan Sisters who lived here were involved in health care and education throughout Western New York. They ministered at such institutions as Mount St. Mary’s Hospital in Niagara Falls, local colleges, high schools and grammar schools. Including my own grammar school.

Nuns have always been the butt of many jokes told by people of all walks of life. And maybe I was at the right age for this, but the sisters who taught me were mostly very nice, and at times sweet ladies. Of course there were one or two that stood out for being ‘mean’, but there are also one or two lay teachers who stand out for the same reason. In my 30’s I had occasion to work with some Felician Sisters, and it was then that I realized for the first time, that sisters are people. (!) They each have their own personality. Some are gossipy, some are pious, some are funny, some are quiet etc. Just people though, trying to get through life just like the rest of us.

Anyway, what a beautiful contemplative place this must have been for them to retreat to, once the rigors of work brought them home in the evenings.

Amherst State Park

The Business End

Roughly 80 acres of the convent land was put up for sale in 1999. New York State and the Town of Amherst acquired the property after splitting the $5 million price tag, in 2000. The agreement states that the town maintain the property which is to be used for conservation and passive recreation only.

And that is exactly how it is being used.

The old convent building is now St. Mary’s Apartments for seniors 55 and over. Very affordable if you look them up. The apartments themselves appear small, but nice. Just think of the yard though! And you wouldn’t have to maintain any of it!

The Park that Brings on Daydreams

While hiking around the park, we came upon a set of old stone stairs. As I walked up them, I had a very clear memory of being of being here, many years ago. My grammar school class had a field trip in what used to be the convent orchard. A couple of us stole away, and when we saw some stairs, we snuck up them. The building we saw at the top was like nothing any of us had ever seen before! We stood at the top of the steps just staring at what we were sure had to be a castle! Are kids still this easily impressed nowadays?

The old orchards are evident in the still existing (apple?) trees. Ellicott Creek ambles in curving paths through the property, bringing peace as it rolls by. Water does that to us, brings peace. There are wooded areas, nature paths, and a bike path too. There are secluded areas, and wide open meadows, and even a pine forest! If this place is not the stuff of daydreams, I don’t know what is!

Graffiti Art and The Cemetery

Bet you’re not used to seeing graffiti art and cemetery used in the same sentence.

Well, while taking a bike ride on another occasion, we took the bike path to the south end of the land. There were some ruins of what appear to be outbuildings for the convent. Now, they are mostly covered in graffiti art, and no one is removing it. Love this.

But when we reached the end of the path, and indeed the property, we noticed a cool looking little chapel in the middle of a field. We, like the little kids who found those stairs years ago, kept going.

Well, it wasn’t a field. It was a cemetery. Specifically, Gethsemane Cemetery, and it appears to be for the sisters who lived and served the community here. The Sisters of St. Francis. I have to admit, it’s a beautiful, serene resting place. And just a stone’s throw to Main Street in Williamsville.

There are still Sisters on the property where we found the cemetery. And they are still serving our community in health care and education. How do I know? We ran into one of them out for an evening walk while I was taking photos of the chapel. She told us she didn’t know the age of the chapel, but she thought it was almost as old as the convent itself. It’s a beautiful little chapel.

My Impressions of Amherst State Park

We all know Glen Park. That gorgeous little park on Main Street in Williamsville with the waterfall. If you go to the parking lot on the other side of Glen Avenue, and follow the creek to the north, you’ll end up in Amherst State Park.

Come to think of it, some college friends and I used to go to that very parking lot on beautiful spring days, take off our shoes and walk the creek for what seemed like miles. It’s not miles to the state park, so I suppose we were on convent land at the time. Hmmm. Good thing the nuns didn’t know what we were up to… 😉 Or maybe they did, and just let us be. Who knows?

St. Francis of Assisi Statue in the cemetery


Anyway, Amherst State Park gives me a good feeling. It’s there for conservation and passive recreation. But really, in my book it’s for walking, hiking, biking, and for getting away from it all. It’s a real retreat from the day to day life right now. And let’s face it, we could all use a break right about now.

The main entrance is on the west side of Mill Street, about halfway between Glen Avenue and Sheridan Drive. If you haven’t been to the park, you should think about getting there this summer. It’s not crowded like a lot of our parks have been this summer. I hope you find it to be as peaceful as I do.

Chestnut Ridge Park

Chestnut Ridge Park

I think of Chestnut Ridge Park as a winter place.  Probably because that’s how I’ve used the park throughout my life.

I don’t have any memories of going there as a small child.  As a young teenager however, I regularly went there for sledding and tobogganing.  The thrill of flying down the hill while practically out of control will always stay with me.  

There was a social aspect as well. Chestnut Ridge has long been the best place to sled in the Buffalo area, and there were always kids there from other schools. Which was exciting in the expanding world of a young teen who was just starting to tug on her mother’s apron strings.  Remember, these were the days when one parent would drive several 13 year olds out to the park and drop them off. Another parent would pick them up 3 or 4 hours later.  We were on our own and testing the waters. 

We felt so free! But in reality, there were enough adults around so that we couldn’t really get into much trouble.  Basically it was good, clean fun, and the memories are indelibly imprinted in my brain.

Photo Credit to Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News

Skip ahead, ahem, several years. Now I return every fall and winter for walking, hiking and snowshoeing.  Chestnut Ridge is arguably the best place around to fully appreciate both fall and winter.  What’s not to love? With its rambling roads, picturesque hiking trails, and the colorful trees in the fall. Oh the trees! The trees in Chestnut Ridge are nothing short of spectacular.

View from the cabin in November.

History

 

That takes me to the history of Chestnut Ridge Park itself.  You know that with me it always comes down to history.

The park was named by early settlers of the area for the magnificent chestnut trees that grew on the land.  It’s located in Orchard Park, NY, twenty-five minutes southeast of Buffalo, and is a little over 1200 acres making it the largest park run by the Erie County Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry.  Delaware Park in Buffalo’s city proper is 350 acres. So Chestnut Ridge covers quite a bit of area. It is in fact, one of the largest county parks in the United States. 

Erie County acquired the land for the park in 1926, a busy year for establishing what the county considers heritage parks, because in that same year, the county also established Como Park and Ellicott Creek Park. These followed Emery Park in 1925. Akron Falls Park was established in 1933. 

These parks are all treasures in their own right, but Chestnut Ridge is the one that speaks to me.  Maybe it’s the fond memories of my teenage years and the nostalgia attached. I’m an old soul and when I hike through Chestnut Ridge Park, I get a feeling of history, yes of nostalgia, and a sense of wistfulness for a simpler time.  

I find it interesting that these are the feelings this place invokes in me, when the very park itself grew up on the backs of those struggling to get through the depression.  

Photos Credited to Chestnut Ridge Conservancy Website

The New Deal

The park’s roads, buildings, shelters and landscaping were improved substantially through the Works Progress Administration during the depression.  It was an agency of Roosevelt’s New Deal and sought to provide employment for households where the main breadwinner was unemployed.  

This agency kept roughly 8.5 million men and women employed between 1935 and 1943.  That’s a lot of people. The workers were paid the prevailing wage of the area at the time. Most were hired as laborers and were put to work creating infrastructure for the nation’s current and future society. Including parks.

Most of the structures you see in Chestnut Ridge Park were built at this time.  Although the original casino seen in the vintage photo above was built in 1925, it was replaced with this stone and timber building as part of this project in 1938 (see below). It’s strategically placed to take full advantage of the views from the natural ridge.  And what views!

Photo Credit to Mark Mulville/Buffalo News
View from the Casino patio.

Present and Future

Earlier I mentioned that the park is maintained by Erie County Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry.  Since 2010, they have been receiving help in this monumental task from the Chestnut Ridge Conservancy, which has helped with many, many projects that have improved park life.  Some of these include, a $40,000 restoration of the 1948 murals inside the casino (!), long range binoculars on the casino patio (that view!), various park benches, stone work restoration, among many others.  Read more about the Chestnut Ridge Conservancy here.

The park is open all year long and everyone, of all abilities, can find something to do there.  From lounging on the patio of the casino, enjoying the view from the top of the ridge to trail running and disc golf.  And from scenic driving to snowshoeing and cross country skiing. Head over to the southwest portion of the park to hike out to the eternal flame falls to see one of Western New York’s most unique attractions.  A small waterfall containing an ‘eternal flame’, created by natural gas. Or take a short walk from the casino to a picturesque lake complete with cabin and fishing pier. This park’s got it all. 

Eternal Flame Falls in Chestnut Ridge Park – Photo Credit to Wikipedia

My Impressions

In the end, I believe it’s the structures built during the depression, coupled with the incredible landscape architecture, some natural, some carefully planned, that gives me the nostalgic feeling I get when I spend time in the park.  

I wonder if those relief workers in the late 1930’s and early 1940’s could have ever imagined the thousands of people all of their hard work would touch. And will continue to touch.   

If you are a regular reader of Hello Buffalo, then you know that Chestnut Ridge is among my favorite places to beat the winter blues.  I’ll be starting those Saturday morning trips to Chestnut Ridge Park very soon.  

Fend off the winter blues this year. Make it a point to get out to Orchard Park to soak up some history, do some sledding, or just enjoy the views, either now or whenever it suits you to go.  Chestnut Ridge Park is spectacular in all four seasons.

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A Walk Through the Village of Williamsville

A Walk Through the Village of Williamsville

Last night I went for a walk with my friend Cathy.   We have this little custom of driving to different areas to walk.   Keeps it fresh, plus we both love looking at homes and generally enjoy seeing different parts of Buffalo.

This time it was my choice, and I told her I wanted her to take me on a tour of Williamsville.   Cathy’s office is in the village, and I know that as a busy small business owner she’s been taking walks through the village now and again to get out of the office, relax and meet her neighbors.   The Village of Williamsville is probably one of the best spots around to do just that.

We started at Island Park, her office being only steps away.   Just inside the park, we came upon the Williamsville South High School Band, playing a summer concert in the park.   What a lovely surprise, and what a superb way to spend a summer evening!   They are a talented group of musicians to be sure.  

We allowed ourselves just a few minutes of enjoying the music.   These walks are for fitness as well as fun!   We walked to the tip of the park and if you go there you’ll see that the park is indeed an island on Ellicott Creek and it comes to a point at the end.   When I was a kid, I imagined the tip of the park was the bow of a boat.   I guess I was a daydreamer even back then.

Walking around the park taking in the views of the creek and the surrounding greenery, it occurs to me that it felt as though we had walked into an oasis, very much like walking into the residential parks in the city.   It’s very serene, natural and calming.   Especially with the music playing softly in the background. What a great place to de-stress after a busy day!   Bring the kids too. There’s a playground for them to enjoy as well.   Very family friendly.    

We moved on to Main Street and zig zagged through a few of the streets just south of Main.   Along the way, we saw plenty of gorgeous homes, felt a very ‘village’ vibe.   Next, we wound our way to over to Garrison Road, and another quaint little park, Garrison Park.   This one is smaller, is all about kids, and is every bit as lovely as Island Park.   Again it’s just one block over from Main Street and all that’s going on there.

We swung back around to Main Street where, by the way, local businesses absolutely abound!   This is a perfect place to support local businesses.   We had a conversation about the new brewery coming to Main Street.   There are so many new breweries all over Buffalo.  Do people really drink that much beer?   We decided that this is Buffalo so yes, yes they do.   And this brewery is perched at the edge of Ellicott Creek and promises very pretty views.   Welcome Britesmith Brewing.   We’ll sample your brews and your views soon!

We walked past the library where we came upon this little walkway that always draws me in.   I love the arrow sign telling me what I already know, that the Village of Williamsville is a walkable community, giving the minutes to each spot instead of miles.   Sweet.

     

Really, really enjoyed getting to know Williamsville again.

By the way, the friend I’m walking with is Cathy Lanzalaco, owner of Inspire Careers. She is in her third year as a small business owner located in this historic and thriving community.   Cathy says of Williamsville, “I love working in the village!   I have been here for almost three years and I love the people, the energy, and the vibe.”   Inspire Careers offers career advisement, resume writing, and job search strategy coaching.   Her most recent addition is a Student Professional Launch Program.   Check out her website here.   Alright, that’s the end of my shameless plug for a great friend…

Neither of us had a lot of time that night so this was a short walk.   Maybe I’ll continue this little tour another day, I’ve enjoyed getting to know Williamsville again.   It’s good to get out in your community and walk.   Explore a little.   Talk to people. Get to know your neighbors.   Become a tourist in your own city!    

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The Tall Ships in Buffalo – Basil Port of Call Buffalo

The Tall Ships in Buffalo – Basil Port of Call Buffalo

When I was a kid, my Aunt was somewhat of a local celebrity in military circles here in Buffalo.   She was one of the first women in the country to become a U.S. Navy Seabee. So whenever anything happened of Naval importance in Buffalo, she was always involved, and was almost always invited as an honored guest.

So when I read about the Tall Ships coming to Buffalo, one of my first thoughts was that if she were still with us, she’d definitely be in attendance.   Not only to visit each ship, but she quite probably would have been among the VIPs attending the after hours receptions as well. And she’d have enjoyed every minute of it.   She loved all things to do with ships and open waters.    

My Aunt Ann.   We affectionately called her Major Houlihan.

So it was with this in mind that I chose to volunteer for this event.   I attended one training session in the beginning of June and I contributed a very small amount of time (six hours) on the 4th of July working with guest services selling tickets, answering guest questions, and handing out pamphlets & maps to arriving guests.   By now you all know how much I love Buffalo. I was happy to be involved in such a monumental event at the waterfront, a place that has played such an important role in our city’s history and will hopefully be an even greater part of our future.

The event was run by the Buffalo Lighthouse Association, under the leadership of Mike Vogel, the Association’s President.   He, along with his committee has been working tirelessly for years to bring this event to Buffalo. The title sponsor for the event was the Basil Automotive Family.   There were many, many more sponsors.   From a volunteer perspective, the event ran pretty smoothly, although I’m sure the people running the show were more stressed than the volunteers.   I had a great time getting to know a couple of my fellow volunteers, and talking to numerous guests as they came through the gates and had questions about the event. It was overall a lot of fun for me, and for most volunteers.    

Photo Credit: Glenn Ferguson.   The Niagara, a brig from Erie, PA, and a frequent visitor to Buffalo.

Photo Credit: Glenn Ferguson.   The Empire Sandy, a tern schooner from Toronto, Ontario, the longest of the twelve.

Photo Credit: Glenn Ferguson.   The Bluenose II, a Gaff topsail schooner from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, the tallest in the fleet.

I did have the opportunity to take a break from my post, just in time to see a bit of the parade of ships coming into the Buffalo Harbor (admittedly a bit later than they were expected, a stroke of good luck for me).    

The parade was…exciting.   I couldn’t have been more surprised.   I didn’t expect exciting, but it truly was.   A few of the ships shot their cannons and that added a bit of drama to the whole scene.   I was glad I was there, and happy for the organizers. Because everyone around me was excited too.   I could see it in their faces, how they reached to get photos, heard all their comments. The crowd was happy to be witness to this magnificent display of some of the most beautiful ships in the world.

                 

I went back the next day with my husband as a tourist in my own city, one of my favorite things, to get a closer look and to board the ships.    

It was hot and humid.   Almost oppressively so.    

We entered the secure zone with our ‘passports’ at Canalside to see the three ships docked there, the Niagara, the Pride of Baltimore, and the Denis Sullivan.   There was one line to see all three ships, and it was long. Very long. It spanned more than the entire length of the boardwalk, and we decided to just get a close up look from there, and to swing back around and see those later.   It was while we were doing that, that we heard there were virtually no lines along the riverwalk to see the three ships docked there, the Bluenose II, the Empire Sandy, and the Picton Castle.

       

     

We walked right up and boarded the Bluenose II immediately. No waiting on this side.   If only we could have gotten the message back to Canalside, and told the people to spread out to all the ships, no one would have had to wait very long at all.   As a matter of fact, the only other line I saw was at the Santa Maria, which I think was due to its overall uniqueness.  

Unfortunately, the weather didn’t cooperate on Saturday.   A friend who volunteered on that day, reported that the rain was monsoon-like.   But she also said it was so hot, she didn’t mind getting wet. Attendance was reportedly down due to the weather, but people still came out.   The Buffalo News reported 15,000 or so that day.   Reports said the near perfect weather on Sunday brought the event to expected numbers.  

All in all, I think it was remarkable.   I’m sure the Lighthouse Association is happy with the outcome.

Were there things that could have been done differently?   Yes. But I’m confident that the organizers have paid very close attention and will make adjustments for next time.   There was the water issue for the first two days. People need to have access to water in the secure areas to stay hydrated in the scorching heat.   Easy fix. There were also the long lines at Canalside. Possibly could be solved by increasing the access to the lower part of the boardwalk, or docking some ships elsewhere in the area to alleviate the long lines.   But either way there will always be long lines whenever you have that amount of people in one place trying to see the same thing.

By all reports, it looks as though the event was a success, and this will become a triennial event, meaning that it’ll happen next in 2022, and again in 2025, which happens to be the 200th anniversary of the opening of the Erie Canal.   That’s bound to bring with it many festivals and celebrations in Buffalo, possibly even throughout that entire year. At least I hope so. We do love our festivals. And by then, all the kinks will have been worked out, and it’ll be smooth sailing for the committee!

This weekend, in true Buffalo fashion, my husband and I tipped back a couple of cold ones to celebrate the Basil Port of Call Buffalo’s success.   I think my Aunt would have done the same. In fact, I know she would have.

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