City Living – Columbus Parkway

City Living – Columbus Parkway

Back in July, we went to a birthday party at Front Park. On the way there we passed by Columbus Parkway. On the way home, we decided to check it out. Wow! I’d heard good things and remembered reading a few articles about this street, but it’s always so much betterto see it in person!

A Little Bit of History, of Course

Prospect Park is bordered by Porter Avenue at the south, Connecticut Street on the north, and Prospect and Columbus Parkway on the east and west respectively. Hiram Pratt, Buffalo businessman and two time mayor of Buffalo, donated the land in 1836 to the City of Buffalo to be used as a park. At the time the property afforded unrestricted views of Lake Erie and the Niagara River. It was a perfect spot for a park.

Sometime before Olmsted designed our park system, homes were built along the perimeter of the park, blocking the beautiful views. This prompted Olmsted to design Front Park. Between 1855 and 1866, Niagara Street was extended north through the very center of Prospect Park. Albeit a smaller scale, this is just like the 198 cutting through Delaware Park! Why do we do these things?

Prospect Park. Just now beginning to see the colors of fall in Buffalo.

In 1952, the western portion of the park was renamed Columbus Park. At that time, a statue of Christopher Columbus was placed on the grounds. The eastern half of the park continued to be known as Prospect Park. In July of 2020, it became known about the controversy and general negativity surrounding Christopher Columbus. The statue was removed. In November of the same year, the Buffalo Common Council voted to change the name of the west side of the park back to Prospect Park. Once again, Buffalo has one, cohesive Prospect Park, save for Niagara Street running through it, of course…

I’m told, and have verified, that there will be a new statue to be erected soon, to replace the Columbus statue. It will be of an Italian immigrant family arriving here for the first time. Very appropriate, because this area was once predominantly an Italian neighborhood. Can’t wait to see it.

Let’s Take a Look at Columbus Parkway

I’ll begin by saying that I didn’t take photos of every home on the street, like I usually do. I covered the three blocks between Porter Ave and Rhode Island Street. There are simply too many homes along this stretch to be able to include them all.

This first one was built for Abner Cutler, who owned A. Cutler and Son, cabinetmakers, manufacturers and dealers of furniture. The business was located at 164-176 Pearl Street, which would have been in the block where the Rath building is now located. They also had a factory in Black Rock. Abner Cutler was issued a patent for the design of the roll top desk in 1882. In fact, he was issued seven patents, all pertaining to the mechanics of the roll top. Cool. And a beautiful home to boot.

This home has had some fairly recent renovations. The working shutters have been removed, original windows were replaced, and sidelights and a transom were added to the front entryway. The sidelights and transom were an aesthetic change. But I was sorry to see the windows replaced (they were fantastic). I suppose I understand the cost involved in maintaining them though, and you’ll get no judgements from me. Just observations.

Next

Across the street from the Cutler home is this beauty, below, currently receiving some love. And it looks to me like they are doing it right! I appreciate this. That upper porch is interesting with it’s ‘step up’ (maybe two) or down depending on how you look at it. Either way this place looks like cocktails on the patios to me. Let’s keep an eye on this one. I think it’s going to be fabulous!

I love the arched portico over the entryway with the fan design underneath on this one, below. And the ribbon windows in the dormer. This place has got little touches like the stone walkway, and the tiled stoop. Very nice! And, they’re Bills fans, so yeah, I like this one.

The brickwork is just great at this next home, below. And check out the wrought iron, unusual and beautiful. I’m so glad they’ve kept it!

Mama Mia! This one, below, is beautiful! But before I get carried away, a quick check with the city shows there are eight apartments here. Okay. Coming back down to earth. But it also says both the upper and lower patios are 10 feet wide by 36 feet long. Now, those are patios! This one is a real stunner.

This next home below, is where I met Alexander and his dog, Otis. Alexander, I apologize, but I cannot remember your beautiful Mother’s name. She was using a leaf blower and both Alexander and Otis were having a grand old time chasing the leaves around! Super cute family moment. All three were really enjoying themselves. Mom told me that she loves living on the street. The neighbors are great, and that most of the homes have original woodwork etc. That’s so great to hear!

And More Columbus Parkway

Here are a few more amazing homes.

Love, love, love this one!

Check out the second floor windows!

These gardens are fantastic!

This two family is very inviting!

This one below is really nice with the rounded porch. There are several of those on this street. Also, the rounded bay windows. There are a lot of those on this street too. Love it!

Wow!

This Queen Anne style home was built for DeWitt Baker in 1883. Oh that gable! Most of the windows appear to be original. And I want to call that finish on the gable pebbling, but on closer inspection, I think it might actually be ‘roughcast’, which is a mixture of small stones, broken glass and cement. That second floor window is beautiful, and the sunburst detail above it is stunning.

There are eight of these townhomes, built in 1989.

Love this one.

Wait till you see this

This next home, below, is spectacular! It’s designed by August Esenwein, of the Buffalo famous Esenwein & Johnson Architectural Firm. (The Calumet Building, the Electric Tower and many, many more.) Just look at those amazing tall (tall!) windows on the driveway side. The scale of this home is incredible! This is one I’d love to go in. Just to see those windows! And what is probably fantastic woodwork and many more details! This one is special!

And what do you think of this beauty, below? I absolutely love it! This street continues to blow me away at every turn. This particular home is so unexpected. Let’s just say, you’re not going to see another like this one today, that’s for sure.

This one, below, is a lovely Second Empire design. I’m pretty sure all the windows (on the front anyway) are original, or at least have been replaced properly. They still have the rounded look and curved top. It looks so nice! The bay window on the first floor is beautiful complete with dentil molding. And I think the sidelights and transom are stained glass. Nice!

And these

Look at the original Palladian window up top, and the curved glass bay on the second floor!

Just lovely!

And Now This

This home was built in 1880 for Edgar B. Jewett. He was the president of the Jewett Refrigerator Company. And if you’re a regular reader of this blog you may remember that my husband, Tim, worked for Jewett Refrigerator Company early on in his career. Cool. Jewett served two terms as Mayor of Buffalo, became the Vice-President of the Cary Safe Company, and served as the President of the Columbia National Bank here in Buffalo. Busy guy. He lived here with his wife, Elizabeth and their four children before building a home at 210 Summer Street in 1900.

This three story home is incredible! It towers over the corner of Columbus Parkway and Columbus Parkway West. Like many on this street, the owner of this home is a fantastic steward of this true Buffalo treasure.

This Next One

Dr. John D. Naples and his wife, Anne, built this home in 1939. Including the extra wide lot which is 80 feet wide! That’s practically unheard of in the city! And of course, you know I love the wide porch on the driveway side of the house. Awesome place to sit and visit.

This One

This home is absolutely massive! The city has it listed as a three-family residence. And I can see where all three could be very large apartments. The house seems to go on forever. I’m told that a woman named Carole lives here, and that she knows everything there is to know about the street. But alas, she was not home the day I was there. Although I’ll tell you I’m not altogether sure I knocked at the right doors. I do wish I could have met her. Carole, your home is beautiful.

After a little digging, I found that Carole and her late husband Carl raised their children in this home. It was designed by an architect out of Rochester named James G. Cutler. Cutler is better known as the person who designed and patented the office building mail chute. Cool.

Moving Along

Love this next home. Take a look at the sunroom at the front of this house. It’s got leaded glass and I think some of the windows in this home may be original. Not all, but some definitely are. Nice.

This next home, below, is where I met Terry. He’s the one who told me Carole is the person to talk to about the history of the street.

Terry had heard at some point that a senator or a congressman lived in his home. He was right. His name was Anthony F. Tauriello, born in 1899. He was an attorney who served on the Buffalo Common Council from 1938-41, and again in 1948. He was elected into the U.S. House of Representatives and served from 1949-51, when he came home to serve again on the Buffalo Common Council from 1954-57. He finished off his career as an appointee to the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority from 1961-73. Not too shabby. Here he is, below.

Anthony F. Tauriello
Photo credit: “Pictorial Directory of the 81st Congress” 1949

Terry, I especially love your entryway at the front of your home. Thank you for taking the time to chat. Appreciate it.

A Few More

There are a few more houses I’d like to share on my way back to Vermont Street before I head home again.

This one is technically on Columbus Parkway West but it’s so gorgeous I can’t leave it out.
Sweet!

Boo! This one’s ready for the great pumpkin!

Love the colors here!

This home, below, is where I met Dave and Chantal. What a beautiful Colonial Revival home they’ve got here. Dave tells me they’ve been here a little less than a year and are in the middle of a kitchen reno. Chantal mentions that she’d like to do some research on the home and the area once the renovation projects are completed. Well, guys, I found that your home was built for Henry Hagen in 1907, but I’m afraid that’s all I was able to find before publishing. I’m sure you’ll be able to see that on your deed, and maybe you’ll find more clues as to the history of the home.

About the house. My favorite thing is that gorgeous rounded porch. Also, the palladian windows at the peaks. There are at least three that can be seen from the street. One at the front, and one at both the north and south sides. And those rounded bay windows on the second floor are beautiful.

And Last But Certainly Not Least

This incredible (and huge) home, below, was built in 1886 for George Sandrock, who was born in Buffalo in 1838. I believe Sandrock was in insurance (Sandrock & Baily, located at 24 Swan Street). He was one of 11 children born to George Sr. & Magdalena Daigler who both came to Buffalo from Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France. The home must have been stunning back then, with the red Medina sandstone lintels, details at the peaks and decorative terracotta here and there mixed in with the brick.

It needs a bit of attention, but looks doable. It’s impressive when you walk by. It’s the way it’s set on the property that is so perfect! The home is on a wide lot (92′ – in the city!) with a large side yard. Plenty of room to spread out. This is the kind of home that makes me want to explore the interior. Well, back in the day when it was a single family home that is. It would be cool to see the original plans. Now that would be something.

The wrought iron fencing out front just may be original. It would take some elbow grease, but it wouldn’t be too expensive to do. I’ll admit though, I wouldn’t want to be the one to do it! Very labor intensive!

All in all, it’s a beautiful Buffalo home.

My Impressions

Columbus Parkway is an almost unbelievable street, and makes me consider the whole of Buffalo. This street is unique in that the homes were built over a period of 100 years or so. Some were built in the 1860s and every decade after, up until the 1960s, and the townhouses were built in 1989. That’s kind of unheard of in Buffalo. There are a few that I can think of offhand, like Edge Park, where some homes were built in one era, and at the other end of the street some were built decades later. Or every once in a while you come across one really old home in the middle of all the others. But this street seems to have had continual building. Very unusual! And may account for the occasional very wide lots.

Two buddies playing around on a summer day. Sweet.

Historic & Present

The homes built here represented people like George Sandrock, who co-owned a small insurance agency, or the doctors and politicians. These were not the lumber barons or the captains of industry from Millionaire’s Row over on Delaware Ave. This street is representative of successful people like a lot of us, who work hard for a living but also enjoy some degree of ‘success’. I love this about Buffalo.

Prospect Park

I have to say that it’s really good to see a young couple like Dave and Chantal moving into this historic neighborhood, taking an interest in restoring their home, and showing the desire to become part of the fabric of the neighborhood. That’s what makes a neighborhood great.

This one seems to be historic, but very present, if that makes sense. Let me try to explain. Everybody I spoke to on the street seems to be very aware of the history here, almost excited about it. But they also seem to realize that while being historic is cool, it’s also important to be present and involved in the here and now. That’s what’s so great about Columbus Parkway.

Next time you’re in the area, make it a point to go see this incredible street.

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City Living – Elmwood Ave

City Living – Elmwood Ave

Elmwood Ave. Where should I begin? I guess at the beginning. But certainly not at the very beginning of Buffalo. Elmwood Ave did not exist then. It wasn’t part of Joseph Ellicott’s design of our city streets. Nor was it planned the way other, larger streets were. Think Main Street or Delaware Ave. Those streets were carefully planned out. Elmwood Ave? Not so much.

Looking north on S. Elmwood Ave (from Johnson Park)

Originally, it ran from North Street to just beyond Amherst Street. And at the time, it was more like a series of smaller streets connected up together. There was talk for years about making it one coherent street but it didn’t happen until the city was readying itself for the Pan Am Exposition in 1901. Even then, it didn’t extend into the downtown core (Niagara Square) or north to the growing suburb of Kenmore. It only ran from Allen Street to just beyond Amherst. It was, however, at this time named Elmwood Ave.

The view south on S. Elmwood Ave, looking toward city hall (from Johnson Park)

It would not be fully extended into downtown until 1912.

Let’s Take a Look

I’ve decided to cover the section of Elmwood Ave between Bryant and Summer Streets. I realize this stretch is not what you probably thought you were going to see today. But I have my reasons for making this my first post about Elmwood Ave. Okay, so I only have one reason.

One of my most faithful readers, Jo Anne, lived along this stretch back in the 1970s, and I’m writing this for her. We’ve become email friends over the past year or so (remember pen pals?). Jo Anne now lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, but visits on occasion (like a lot of readers of the blog), and enjoys these ‘hikes’ around the area.

This one’s for you Jo Anne. Surprise!

Let’s Go

I’m going to begin at Summer Street on the east side of Elmwood. This is the first home I see. What a start to this hike! This Colonial Revival was built around 1888, and is made of Onondaga Limestone. Love the look of this house. Note the pedimented dormers, look at the curve of the center one, I believe that’s called a swan’s neck pediment. Sexy. Just look at the wide wooden trim, accented by the wreaths and ribbons. It’s just lovely. The front door and sidelights appear to be floating above the portico. It’s how they’re set into the limestone. Love it.

In the 1890s, William C. Warren lived in this home with his wife Clara (Davock). Warren was born and raised in Buffalo, attended Yale University and was the editor and publisher of the Buffalo Commercial, a newspaper well known in the area for its progressiveness tempered with sound conservatism. William Warren was very well respected in both Republican and progressive circles, but he never ran for public office. Interesting. If only we could find someone with that kind of balance today – and if we could get him/her to run for public office. That would be great! Just sayin.

This Home, in 1915

In 1915, Judge Charles B. Wheeler was living in the home, and this is what it looked like then, below. It appears there used to be a widow’s walk at the roof, a balustrade on the roof of the portico, and the wreaths and ribbon on the trim are painted a darker color, probably black. Wish the old girl still had some or all of this. I can’t say for sure, but it looks like the front door is recessed just a bit, and I think the modern door is flush with the building. Which may account for the ‘floating’ look. I like it both ways.

Photo credit: Beautiful Homes of Buffalo, 1915 edition

The building is now home to a wealth management company. Interesting history here though.

Next

I always wonder how critical I should be when looking at homes. I realize sometimes owners are up against it to keep up these old treasures. The work is so expensive, and can be difficult to keep up with, so I hesitate to be negative. This one, below, has seen better days, but is obviously a diamond in the rough. Would love to see it brought back, even just a bit.

The roof appears sound to my eye. Some paint and then maybe some work on the windows would go a long way here. Look at that bullseye window at the peak. Could be beautiful, but it also looks like not just anyone could fix that. Same with some of the shingles. It’d have to be a skilled craftsman. And those don’t come cheap, with good reason.

This one could come back better than ever. And so I’m going to call it ‘one to watch’.

Take a Look at This One

Next, is this absolute beauty.

The colors are perfect and are perfectly executed. The ionic columns on the porch match the ones on the second and third floor windows, and are amazing, as is the broken pedimented dormer with its half moon window, which on closer inspection has spider webbed leaded glass. Cool!

These Next Few

The word that keeps coming to mind is amazing. Simply amazing.

This first one has been maintained so well. Love the ribbon windows in the peak with the shell trim above – so pretty!

Would love to sip cocktails on that upper patio!

I love everything about this next one, below. The use of Roman brick is spectacular. And the Medina sandstone foundation is very practical, but its use as keystones is fabulous! It ties it all together. Also note the original wrought iron at the front of the home. I see the shape of that railing foundation all over Buffalo, but there are usually no longer railings attached. Most people add newer railings to the actual stairs. Love that these are original!

This home was once a lighting store called Schneider’s Lighting Studio, and was advertised as Buffalo’s largest display of lamps and shades. Neat! Later, in the 1940s, it was broken into several small apartments. It now serves as law offices.

And More

This one needs some attention. But it has great bones!

The home below was built for Elbert B. Mann, who was the manager of Flint & Kent, a large dry goods store, located on Main Street.

Below is the home as it appeared in 1915. The original windows really add something, don’t they? Love the splayed lintels above the windows! Also, note the chimneys have been removed (above), as has the balustrade on the portico. Would love to see the windows on the dormers returned to something close to the original windows.

Hubbell, Mark H., “Home of Elbert B. Mann, 339 Elmwood Avenue.,” Digital Collections – University at Buffalo Libraries, accessed September 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.buffalo.edu/items/show/80299.

These Next Two

The next two homes are law offices. And the first one is an E.B. Green design! For that reason, I’m going to show it to you as he designed it in 1899, first. And is it ever lovely! It’s everything I would expect from E.B. Green and more! Love this home!

It was built for Philip G. Schaefer, a Buffalo brewer. And as we’ve learned in the past here on the blog, in general, brewers do okay for themselves here in Buffalo! Wink, wink…

It’s Friday, I’m in love! Photo Credit: The Buffalo History Museum

And here it is today – every bit as beautiful! Love the dormers and balustrade at the top of the home. Note the sidelights to the windows on the first floor – nice touch EB!

The transition between the two.

And the second home included in the same address. Love the color continuity between the two.

These

One of several apartment buildings on this stretch.

This home, below, once belonged to Dr. A. L. Benedict and his wife. In 1943, he spoke to the Buffalo Courier Express about his family coming to Buffalo via the Erie Canal from Schenectady over 100 years before. His grandfather, the Rev. Stephen van Rensalaer arrived with his wife and nine children on a packet boat, to make their home on Carroll Street, which ran between Washington and Ellicott Streets. Benedict told of stories he had heard throughout the years about the family walking to The Terrace and Main Street to get water (it was the closest pump).

Van Rensalaer came to work as pastor of the First Universalist Church, then at Washington and Swan Streets. Cool story. It seems like Dr. Benedict did alright for himself with this home on Elmwood Ave. It’s a beautiful Tudor. Love the entryway and the porch! Very inviting!

This next one, below, is interesting too. A woman named Alice G.R. Owen lived here when she passed away in 1951, at the age of 80. She was born in France in 1871 to English parents. At 16, she moved to Toronto, and shortly after that Alice came to Buffalo to stay. She studied at Buffalo General Hospital, and completed her studies in 1896. She then worked as a surgical nurse for Dr. Roswell Park! Cool!

During World War I she worked as an Army nurse at Veterans Hospital in the Bronx. After the war, Alice went back to school to become a medical technologist. She came out of retirement to work as a nurse and laboratory technician in the field during World War II. I think I would have liked Alice. And she lived for much of that time in this apartment building (above), on Elmwood Ave. Cool.

Now These

Anybody would love to live here!

A new driveway for this stunner!

Opposing political views under the same roof! Yikes!

Note the Palladian window at the side above the entryway. And I love the balustrade on the porch!

These next two photos will be Musical Suites (the name is a nod to the Community Music School which used to be housed in the second photo). The project is being undertaken by Schneider Development. Read more about it here.

The new build.

Existing 1910 building.

Benjaman’s Art Gallery – the home itself is a stunner!

Always loved this building at the corner of Bryant!

Crossing the Street

Here is the first home I come to on the west side of the street near Bryant. This is one I’d love to get into and check out. I’d especially love to see the yard – it’s a double lot! This home is beautiful! In my mind’s eye, there should be a covered patio coming off the north side of the house, and plenty of greenery and colorful flowers in the yard. And take a look at the side entryway with porch above! Wow!

Jo Anne’s Former Home

Now we come to it. The home that Jo Anne lived in during the 1970s.

The structure itself appears to be in really great shape. It’s got good bones, as they say. It wouldn’t take too much effort to get the landscaping cleaned up a bit to bring this house back to its original glory. Love it that the upper porch is still usable, so many aren’t anymore.

Like with almost every home, there is interesting history here too. In the 1950’s, this house was home to the Queen City Chess Club. I found an article in the Buffalo Courier Express from 1970 about a 12 year old boy (described as almost 13) who plays chess against 25 people simultaneously! He won 16 of the games, lost 2, and tied in 7. Young Peter Winston did this while holding a bottle of soda in one hand and making his moves with the other. And the other players were mostly adults who were champions themselves! Wow! Anybody thinking of The Queen’s Gambit right now? Many championships were won and lost in this house! These two brothers, below, were featured in an article in the Buffalo Evening News on October 10, 1955.

During the 1960s and 70s (including when Jo Anne lived here) the building was home to at least two bridge clubs. As in the card game. One was the Buffalo Whist Club and one was a chapter of the Frontier Bridge Club. I found many articles in several local papers about bridge, winners and their scores, where the games were held and who beat whom… It was a big thing, and Buffalo is still host to bridge tournaments. Jo Anne remembers the games going on into the night when she lived at 410.

A Pan American Exposition Connection

In addition to all of this, the Honorable William Buchanan who was the Director General of the Pan American Exposition lived in this home during and after the exposition.

William Buchanan
Photo Credit: Unknown

He was charged with the construction, the operation and the dismantling of the exposition. I saw several ads in newspapers offering various expo buildings for sale. Interested parties were to come to this home to sign the necessary paperwork. These were run in local papers all through 1902. I guess I never really thought about who took care of all of that after the expo closed at the end of October. But someone had to, and that someone lived in Jo Anne’s house!

Another Apartment Building

This building had some construction work going on in the courtyard between the two sides, but normally when I walk by, it looks like a lovely place to live.

And These

Love that ribbon and wreath trim on that rounded bay window!

This is a beautiful Victorian era home. Even the attorney’s sign (shingle) hearkens back to an earlier time. Love it!

And one more apartment building.

This house is just so nice to look at. It’s very welcoming – I want to spend time on that porch!

Beautiful!

It’s around here that I met Ron and his dogs. I should say his Mother’s dogs. Sadly, she passed away about five months ago. Ron just moved into this apartment, (home pictured below) a month ago, because his last place didn’t allow pets. He says his apartment is beautiful, and he’s enjoying being back in the Elmwood Village. We’ll have to take your word for it on the inside. We can’t see much of the outside, but the second floor makes me want to see more!

You’re a good son, Ron.

And one last house.

A lovely Tudor duplex for all you ivy lovers out there!

And there’s just one more building I’d like to show you. It’s the Buffalo Tennis and Squash Club. I’ve been past this building a million times and I have to say, I’ve never really noticed it. It’s beautiful. I love how original it is. I mean, those windows and for that matter, the shutters all look original. Love that.

My Impressions

This was a very different hike for me. It’s an area I haven’t spent a whole lot of time in. For me, it’s a pass through spot. You know, the areas that you pass through to get to a specific place. I’ve noticed the big old homes here, but never really looked at them. For this, I have Jo Anne to thank, by letting me know she used to live at 410. After that, my interest was piqued!

Knowing the history of Elmwood Ave really makes me think. It’s one of Buffalo’s busiest, best urban thoroughfares, and yet it wasn’t planned that way. It sort of evolved as the city evolved. And our city is still evolving. The conversation of just exactly how to do that is still a hot topic! And that’s a good thing.

Go See It

For me, when I see these old, grand homes that are now apartments, or offices, I end up daydreaming about the families who once lived in them, as single family homes. They make me want to time travel back to the days when Buffalo was experiencing the so-called ‘gilded age’. These homes make me want to see the stories first hand. But, until someone perfects time travel, I’ll have to be content with the written word, and sometimes a photograph or two.

Like I always say, every home, every building, every neighborhood’s got a story to tell. The buildings are nothing without knowing the stories of the people who built them, lived, loved, laughed and cried in them. That’s what I’m after. Go see your city, Buffalo. Get the stories.

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City Living – Mariner Street

City Living – Mariner Street

The other day, I spent about three hours doing what I love best. Just walking around the city. You’d be surprised at how much ground you can cover in three hours. But this day, I spent almost the whole time concentrated in one area. Allentown – one of my first loves. And I walked slowly. I didn’t want to miss anything. Today I’m writing about Mariner Street, the stretch between North and Allen Streets.  But first, let’s talk briefly about Allentown itself.

Lewis Allen

There’s so much history here in Allentown. I find myself thinking about Lewis Allen. (Josh Allen came later!) A lot of Buffalonians know Allentown is named for Lewis Allen. Some even know that he was Grover Cleveland’s uncle. But you may not know that Allen’s wife was the one who was related to Grover Cleveland. Isn’t it funny that we never hear about Margaret Allen in that context? I think it’s important enough to mention.

It is true though, that when Cleveland was passing through Buffalo on his way to Cleveland, Lewis Allen persuaded him of the merits of staying in Buffalo. Buffalo was, after all, a thriving, growing, important city at the time. Cleveland, of course, stayed, studied law, went into politics, and well, the rest is history.

What you also may not know, is that Lewis Allen came to Buffalo (with Margaret) in 1827, at a time where Buffalo was just beginning to experience the immense growth to come. Opportunity was everywhere.

A couple of years later, he purchased 29 acres of land that is now almost all of Allentown. You see, one of his endeavors was as a cattle rancher. It is said that his cattle trod a path from Main Street over to what is now Days Park. And that path has become our modern day Allen Street, a beacon in the city for shopping, dining and nightlife.

One more thing you also may not know is that Lewis Allen never actually lived in Allentown. He lived over on Niagara Street in a home previously occupied by Peter Porter. The home (estate, really) was between West Ferry and Breckinridge (see below) with a view of the river. Grover Cleveland lived here with his Aunt and Uncle for a short time when he first came to Buffalo.

Photo credit: The Picture Book of Earlier Buffalo, Frank H. Severance, 1912

Let’s Check Out Mariner Street

I was so taken with Mariner Street! The colors of the homes! Not to mention the ages of them. There are quite a few from the mid 1800s. The gardens! And later, when I did a little digging, the people who lived in them! Let’s see this street.

As I rounded the corner from North Street on to Mariner, I notice this Georgian Revival apartment building designed and built by E.B. Green in 1914. It is certainly something to look at. And it’s luxurious inside with features like marble entry halls and intricate plasterwork ceilings, not to mention servant’s quarters!

Love the Medina sandstone walkway and the wrought iron in the entryway!

It’s fitting that when the movie Marshall was filmed in the E.B. Green designed (former) federal courthouse downtown, Thurgood Marshall’s apartment was filmed here, in one of these apartments designed by Green as well. This was, by the way, Green’s only foray into real estate speculation.

There’s another gorgeous apartment building, right next door, on a smaller scale, but no less beautiful! Love, love, love the entryway here! Great brickwork!

Music Lessons Anyone?

This next house is one I think most would love to call home. In 1894, a gentleman by the name of Mr. E. H. Ferguson was teaching guitar, banjo and mandolin out of this home, which he called the Buffalo School of Music. I’d love to see this street in 1894!

When, oh when, will time travel be a thing?

Take a look at these next homes.

Love the decorative trim at the peak!

The paint job at the entryway makes this home pop!

Love this entryway with its curves and wrought iron!

Real, working shutters on original windows! And the trim around the entryway, wow! Love this place!

Dr. Ruby Butler

This next home was the home of Dr. Ruby Butler. She graduated from the American School of Osteopathy in Missouri in 1914. Dr. Butler practiced for a short time in Jefferson, Ohio before opening a practice in this home, below. She stayed here until around 1950 when she moved to Springville to live with her sister, where she practiced on a limited basis until her retirement. Very progressive woman! And a lovely home!

These!

Love the colors here!

It’s tough to see the tops of these houses for the trees! But just look at the entryway on the blue home, below. So charming!

The decorative trim is spectacular!

Love these gardens!

This is the best shot I could get of this charmer! Very private! Wouldn’t you love to sit on the upper patio in the evening with a glass of wine? I know I would!

A Sad Story

This was once the home of Staff Sgt. John W. Haney, below.

The home is lovely, with very original windows at the front of the house. The brick enclosed garden adds a certain charm as well.

Sadly, in 1944, Haney was killed during maneuvers in a medium bomber during an electrical storm over Hartselle, Alabama. He was 33 and left a wife, Alice, both his parents, one sister and four brothers. Haney entered the service in 1942, studied as a mechanic at a bomber school in Baltimore and was stationed in Hunter Field, Georgia. What a sad, sad story. One heard all too often during wartime.

Photo Credit:
Buffalo Evening News, April 11, 1944

Next Door

Right next door to Sgt. Haney’s home, I have three stories to tell you. One was from World War I, and one from World War II. One of the owners of this home, Cornelius A. Wild passed away in 1948 at the age of 75. He worked on the great lakes as a marine engineer until World War I, when he was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. After the war Wild worked as chief engineer at Sheas Great Lakes, Lafayette Theater, as well as Majestic Theater. He was also chief engineer on site when our great City Hall was being built. Cool!

Just three years earlier, Wild’s son, Cornelius D. Wild, returned home in 1945 from a German prison camp. He was injured a year earlier and spent time in a military hospital in France, before being taken to the camp. The young Wild graduated from Canisius College and worked at General Motors before enlisting in 1942. The photo below is from the Buffalo Evening News, May 25, 1945

Pvt. Cornelius D. Wild

Okay, so I have one more story about this house. This warrants another photo to clear our minds of war, before moving on to bookmaking.

That’s Right, I Said Bookmaking

Quintessential Allentown colors!

So, in 1970, a woman living in this house, above, was arrested for bookmaking. Gladys Oates was reportedly a tavern keeper, and ran a bookmaking ring out of this home, taking in $3,000 a week. But that was not all, she had others working with her. A total of 14 people were arrested and the total take was $8 million. That’s a lot of bread! Ha! There are times when I cannot believe the audacity of some people!

Oh, Buffalo.

Update: Sept. 22, 2021

I received an email from the nephew of Gladys Oates who sent me the following photos. The first is a calling card that belonged to Jimmie(y) Oates, who was married to Gladys. Jimmie was an entertainer and was known as “the Pennsylvannia Nightengale”. He and Gladys met while performing with the same traveling troup. They married in St. Louis in 1927.

After coming to Buffalo, the couple lived on Mariner Street, which we already discussed. What we didn’t know is that they owned “The Jimmie Oates Grill” which was at the corner of Allen and Mariner Streets (now The Old Pink!). Jimmy passed away in 1970, presumably before the arrests for bookmaking, but clearly, he was involved.

Photo used courtesy of Tim Montgomery

I looked into the phrase ‘Walk Slow’ and my take is that in this particular use, it meant proceed with care. Interesting. Did Jimmie know the ‘heat was on’? Either way, he passed way before the arrests, including that of his wife, Gladys.

Incidentally, I found an article stating that all the charges in the case were dismissed in 1973. Apparently officials used wire tapping to compile their evidence. The defense claimed they used the wire tapping too broadly, listening in on private conversations, not just ‘business transactions’. Seems a pretty flimsy defense, but it worked. Below is a photo of ‘Jimmy’ and Gladys in happier times. Wonder if the photo was taken in the yard on Mariner?

Photo used courtesy of Tim Montgomery

Like I always say, every house holds stories. Most of which we’ll never know. But once in a while, we get a glimpse.

Let’s Move On, Shall We?

Let’s travel back to 1948 (the 40s were very busy on this street!). This is the story of a mother/daughter duo who came over from England to settle in Buffalo. Violet Russell, a partner in the Anglo-American Carbonising Corporation came to live in this home, below, with her daughter, Joan Russell.

Isn’t the house fantastic?!

Joan

Joan was a mechanical engineer. In 1948! She sought to come to Buffalo during a time when you could wait months for tickets for a transatlantic crossing. No worries, she and her mother both signed on to work as crew members on a cargo ship! Joan reportedly blew everyone away in the engine room, and was given the honorary title “Sixth Engineer” by the Captain.

Photo Credit: Buffalo Evening News, Feb. 24, 1948

After settling on Mariner Street, Joan then took her place as a mechanical engineer at Cherry, Cushing and Preble, a consulting engineering firm located on Delaware Avenue. She worked on heating systems. Cool.

Just a note: my husband works as a mechanical design engineer, and there are still not too many women working as engineers. So for 1948, this was amazing!

Both Violet and Joan loved Buffalo. When questioned though, Joan confessed to having an issue with our weather. She stated that our “nice, cold winters are fine, but that our summers are too hot!”*

That’s kind of hilarious!

Two very interesting women, wouldn’t you say?

Moving Right Along

And crossing the street, these.

This yellow magnificence below. There is so much that I like about this one. The window trim. The side entry appears amazing, but I’d have had to go up the driveway to really see it properly! The front doors appear to be original! Is that even possible?! I mean, this house is listed with the county as being built in 1865! If they were added later, boy are they done well! Love this place!

This one’s even older, above, at 1854! Could it be more perfect?

These next three are triplets!

And twins!

I keep wanting to say perfection!

Beautiful! I want to go on the second floor porch at the rear of the house! The windows appear to be original, no small feat with this house!

Wait Till You Hear This!

So we’ve discussed World War I and World War II. Mariner Street also had a gentleman who took part in the Civil War, believe it or not. Actually, judging by the ages of the homes, I shouldn’t be surprised. There were probably several Civil War vets who lived here.

Fast forward to May, 1939. Buffalo was preparing for their annual Memorial Day Parade. The Grand Marshal of the parade was an 89 year old veteran of the Civil War named Edward Hurley.

Buffalo Evening News, May 26, 1939

He lived on Mariner in this house, below. Nice!

Who Was He?

In an interview with the Buffalo Evening News Hurley admitted that he was just 14 years old when he marched with General William Tecumseh Sherman through the south! Fourteen! And he said he was not the youngest. Talk about “boys in blue”! Hurley served for six months, and was on guard duty when Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. Walbridge of Buffalo (same family that the Walbridge Building on Court Street is named for) rode in to tell General Sherman of the north’s victory signaling the end of the war.

He went on to say that those six months were both horrifying and exciting. I cannot imagine. At fourteen!

Hurley was apparently well known in Buffalo as a contractor. He worked on the state hospital in Gowanda, the Jamestown Post Office, and our own Erie County Hall (completed in 1876).

Pretty amazing man.

Let’s Keep Moving

Lovely!

Katherine Cornell on Mariner Street

This last home on the block, below, was the Queen Anne style childhood home of Katherine Cornell.

Now the Cornell name is very well known around Buffalo. Katherine’s grandfather was S. Douglas Cornell, of the Cornell Lead Works, located where the Delaware Midway Homes now stand on Delaware Avenue. In 1894, S. Douglas built a beautiful French Renaissance Revival mansion, designed by Edward Kent. Cornell had Kent build a theater on the fourth floor of the home. He had retired from the Lead Works in 1888, and wanted to pursue one of his passions, namely directing and producing plays.

S. Douglas Cornell House, Delaware Ave.
Photo Credit: Art Institute Chicago – Ryerson & Burnham Archives

The mansion became a popular place for Buffalo society and artisans alike to see plays among friends. Katherine Cornell spent a lot of time at this home, watching the whole process from casting, to rehearsals to full on production. It was here that Katherine caught the acting bug.

Katherine Cornell
Photo Credit: Howard Beach

She began acting and had her first break when she played Jo in the London production of Little Women. In 1921, she had her first big hit in the United States in Bill of Divorcement. She went on to become one of the country’s most sought after theatre actors. Cool!

And she grew up on Mariner Street.

My Impressions

It feels so good to get back into Allentown for one of these posts. The homes are old and mostly well kept. The colors are definitely the widest variety in the city. And the overall feeling here is one of serenity and peace. Maybe that comes with the overall Allentown attitude of freedom and acceptance.

That said, I didn’t get a chance to talk to anyone who lived on Mariner while I was there. That’s always a disappointment, but there was so much history to be found here! The music teacher from the late 1800s. The veterans – from three wars! A book maker and a famous actress (not to mention that she was a Cornell!). And I ran into my old friend E.B. Green. This was an interesting street indeed!

Art is everywhere in Allentown. Very cool.

And the homes are old! Many of them from the mid 1800s. As I walked along, I was struck by what good shape most of them are in. I could easily live on this street. Specifically, in the bright yellow home, or the blue one next door with all the window boxes. Love them both! Actually, I could name several more that would do nicely. Haha!

Next chance you get, take a walk around Allentown. Pay attention to details and take a moment to notice the feel of the area. It’ll bring your stress levels down. And we could all use a bit less stress now, couldn’t we?

*Special thanks to Tim Montgomery for providing family insight and photos of Jimmie & Gladys Oates.

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City Living – Dorchester Road

City Living – Dorchester Road

Dorchester Road has been one of my favorites from the first time I noticed it. And I’ve been wanting to write about it since I first started blogging, actually. Last weekend, I went on a tour with Preservation Buffalo Niagara that highlighted some of E.B. Green’s work in Buffalo. All I could think during the entire tour was that it was time to write about Dorchester. So here we are.

A peek into Dorchester Road from Bidwell Parkway.

I first became aware of this street about a dozen years ago. I’d seen it before from Bidwell Parkway, but had never had a reason to walk down it. One day I was in no particular hurry, and so I ventured in off Bidwell. Let me tell you what a sweet spot this street is. It’s one of my favorites in the entire city. It’s got everything! For a lack of a better way of saying it, Dorchester has a feeling of exclusivity while at the same time being extremely neighborly. I know that doesn’t make any sense, but it’s true.

I mean, the homes are spectacular and stunning, and yet everyone you meet is willing to chat about whatever comes up. And, it’s right next door to the intersection of Elmwood and Bidwell, which is one of Buffalo’s most walkable neighborhoods. Dorchester is quiet serenity, in walking distance to everything you need.

And if that wasn’t enough, there are six, yes six, E.B. Green homes on this street! If you’re a regular reader, you know about my admiration for E.B.! My history nerd personality knows no bounds, and I don’t care! Ha!

Let’s Talk About EB Green for a Sec

Edward Brodhead Green was born in 1855 in Utica, NY. He studied architecture at Cornell University and was the eighth person to receive a degree from that school in the study of architecture. Before that time, architecture was viewed as more of a trade than a profession, and architects were trained by other working architects in the field.

In 1881, he and William Sydney Wicks made their offices in Buffalo. It was the perfect place for an architect to live at the time. Buffalo was growing like mad, people had money, and they were building. Buffalo kept the pair busy until Wicks retired in 1917.

Green continued on working with his sons, who were both architects, and with other architects, until his death in 1950. In his career, he designed over 370 buildings, and two-thirds of them were in Buffalo! That’s a lot of buildings!

E.B. Green

You know some of his designs. They include the Market ArcadeBuffalo Savings Bank (Goldome), the Fidelity Trust Building (Swan Tower), and the Albright Art Gallery (Albright Knox). He also designed practically every other mansion on Delaware Avenue’s Millionaire’s Row. The Goodyear Mansion, the Foreman Cabana House and the Clement Mansion (American Red Cross). Just to name a few. And there are many, many more. 

Green moved in high social circles in Buffalo. His closest friend became John J. Albright, largely through all the work Green did for Albright on various buildings and homes. There’s a story that was told by Albright’s grandson, that when the Albright mansion on West Ferry burned to the ground, Albright came across E.B. on the grounds during the fire. He greeted Green by saying something like, “Well, Green, have you brought plans for the new house?”

Green was, and still is, Buffalo’s most prolific architect. Partially because he lived to be 95 years old. But partially because of his passion for design, and his willingness to create the designs his clients wanted.

There are six E.B. Green designs on Dorchester.

So Let’s See Dorchester

I’m beginning at the northwest corner of Richmond and I’ll move west. This is the home I was in front of when I took out my camera to start snapping photos. I actually thought it was on Richmond (as the number 734 shows), but the city and the county both have it listed at 75 Dorchester. Who knew? And also, talk about porch envy! This home is fantastic, and a great start to my hike!

Coming around the corner and heading west towards Baynes, these are the homes I saw. This first one is lovely. Interesting how the front entry is enclosed in glass, right on the porch. I wonder if it’s original? The wrought iron railings make me wonder if they are original, or if the wooden balustrade is? It’s all very well done, and the porch is very inviting.

These yellow shutters appear to be original, and are real, working shutters. Nice!

This one, below, is the same color of the house I grew up in, and it gives me a good feeling. I especially like the brackets under the eaves on both the house and the dormers. With the morning sun shining in the sunroom, I picture myself sipping tea and reading in the mornings here. Love it.

This home below is the quintessential city home. The shingling on the peak, the palladian window, and the dentil molding. And the porch, with its brick columns, and this one also has windows on the weather side. Nice! Love the little lending library too!

The mix of styles on this house, below, works really well. Note the tie rod and anchor securing the chimney. There are several on the block, and this one is lovely. When I see shades on either end of porches like this, I know the people who live here actually use the porch. With the shades, they can relax here during more than just sunny, warm weather. Or maybe they’re trying for privacy from their neighbors, who knows? Haha!

And these

Spectacular – each in its own way.

Love this ocular window with its lintel and keystone. Nice touch!

Love the sunburst balustrades here. Seeing more and more of this type of thing, and I am loving it!

Love the sidelights in this entryway. Also, note the original windows in the dormers (someone added outer aluminum, but the inside, I’m pretty sure, are original).

Awnings done right! They are all the same color, but the morning sun has brightened up the upper awnings. The awning off the porch is unusual and must make it a nice, cool spot to sit in the summer heat!

The First E.B. Green Home

As I approached the first E.B. Green home of the day, I immediately notice the tile roof, the brick lintels above the windows and the brick quoins at the corners of the house. Also, the obviously original wrought iron balustrade. Beautiful. This house was built in 1914 for Edmund Thomas.

Then I see two people working on the gardens out front. Lucky me! It’s here that I meet the owner, Megan (pronounced Meegan) and her friend Skip. Skip kept busy with the garden, but Megan was more than willing to chat.

She bought this home just over two years ago, after moving from Soldier’s Place, where she raised her four children.

Megan has done a lot of work to the home in those two short years and she showed me some of it. Let’s go out back.

Note the detail on the columns & pilasters, the dentil molding & corbels. Fabulous!

Megan did extensive work in the sun room overlooking the patio. The windows are original. She added the patio on to the back of the house. Absolutely stunning! The craftsmanship here is beyond comparison. I looked pretty closely (like my father taught me!), and I couldn’t find one thing out of place. Everything is correctly scaled, all angles meet perfectly, it’s trimmed with copper, and it matches the style of the house. It even has a tile roof to match the house. In short, it’s perfect.

Lovely!

Megan is not done yet! She has plans to convert the two car garage into an entertainment space. It’s all original, brick, and has tons of potential! Megan is also looking for someone to work on the stucco on the house… Anyone?

Skip flashes a quick smile before returning to his work in the garden.

And what a garden it is!

I take a last look at this beauty before reluctantly moving on. Thank you Megan!

Then These

These next several are so pretty!

And this, below,…wow! The sun hit it just right as I was walking by. Beautiful!

Love everything about this one, right down to the sweet little gate at the top of the stairs!

These next door neighbors are very similar, but executed somewhat differently. Both are great homes!

And these.

Moving Right Along

As I move east towards Richmond and then Claremont, I notice this peaceful feeling has come over me. This street is an oasis. I hear only the sounds of summer. The crickets and birds singing. Gonna have to watch for one of these gems to go up for sale. Would love to live here.

After crossing Richmond, I came upon this stunner. And it’s where I met Faye, her two children and her Mother. Faye has been here six years and loves it. I’m happy to see a young family living on this street. For some reason, I’m always happy to see families filling these beautiful homes. I think it’s what they were built for. And Faye, love your gardens and yard. Just beautiful.

And these

The gardens!

This is where I met Bonnie. She and her family are just moving in. They’ve moved here from a home they still own over on (I think) Ardmore. She tells me they love the area and wanted to stick close, but they needed more room. Great choice in this home, below, Bonnie. As she pointed out to me, the porch adds something extra to the Colonial look of the home. I agree. Love all the detailing here too.

This house was once home to Mr. & Mrs. Judson Rumsey. Big name in Buffalo. Their daughter, Dallas Eugenia Rumsey, was a graduate of Buffalo Seminary and Radcliffe College. She worked as the curator of the Keats Collection in the Houghton Library at Harvard University. Nice!

Dallas married Richard Finn, a graduate of Nichols School and (you guessed it) Harvard University. He served as an officer in the Navy during World War II, and eventually was named to a post as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer (diplomat) to Japan. That must have been an interesting job in 1947!

Bonnie’s kids, and some others from across the street, have made an obstacle course on the road. I love this! (Although Bonnie didn’t look old enough to have kids who could do anything but scribble!)

A Few Others

This next house, below, used to be the home of Leo W. Stall, a long-time Buffalo pharmacist, who had his shop at the corner of Grant Street at Bird Ave. He was written up in the Buffalo Evening News in May of 1956 for celebrating 55 years as a pharmacist, and 44 years in the same location. He spoke to the News about the changes that had taken place since he became a pharmacist, the biggest of which was antibiotics. But right behind that was the use of many other medicines instead of the traditional herbs and tinctures that were popular when he received his pharmacy degree from the University of Buffalo School of Pharmacy in 1901. Stall stated that the new medicines were “a hundred times more effective”.

The things he must have witnessed in his time as a pharmacist in Buffalo at that time! And he lived in this beautiful home on Dorchester Road.

I received an email from Leo Stall’s granddaughter, Suzanne, who sent me this photo, below, of the Stall family. It is from roughly 1929. It seems the family were very hospitable! Suzanne still has the lamps and and the painting behind the family! Thank you for sharing this with us, Suzanne!

Love these!

Let’s Finish Up with the Other E.B. Green Homes

I was so thrilled to see these homes (I knew they were here, but never really sought them out until recently). Here they are, in no particular order.

This is the Fred Dullard House, built in 1910. I admit, I’d love to see this one, below, with some of the plant life removed. Or trimmed way back. I see what I think are Tudor influences, some quoining, some brackets, but it’s tough to say. I cannot even see the entry. Wish we could see it better. Maybe someday.

C.E. Mickler House

This one, below, is lovely, and also has some Tudor influences. It was built in 1909 for C.E. Mickler.

I love the way the entryway is set back. It’s gorgeous. This home is meticulously maintained, but in my opinion, a little boring. Not what I expected from the great E.B. Green! But we have to remember, that was part of his genius. He did what the customer asked of him. Sometimes he was allowed to run free with his designs, sometimes not so much.

H.S. Griffin House

This next one was built in 1907 for H.S. Griffin and if you are a fan of ivy, then this one’s for you. I, however, am not a big fan. Let me see your house! That’s how I feel. I’ve heard people say that the ivy ruins your foundation, some say it doesn’t. I’ve done a little reading on the subject and the consensus is that it depends on the quality of the home and what kind of condition it’s in. In other words, the definitive answer is maybe it will, maybe it won’t. Haha. Sorry. The jury is still out on that subject.

No one could argue that in this case, it would be easier to see the home without the ivy. I think it’s a lovely house and if you’d like to see more of it, check out this listing.

H.C. Gerber House

The next one, below, is my favorite E.B. Green home on the street. It was built for H.C. Gerber in 1908.

It reminds me a little bit of one of Green’s homes on Summit Ave, but I like this one better. In fact, there’s nothing that I don’t like about this home. I love the colors chosen, and the use of each one. The Roman bricks, and the Flemish bonding used are fantastic. I love that the shutters are real, and that the cut-outs are diamonds, not the usual hearts. The wide dormer is great, and the dark entryway is drawing me in. I’d love to see the inside of this one!

William H. Scott House

This home is spectacular. It was built in 1903. for William Scott. And it’s larger than it appears in the first photo. You see, it’s a sort of flat iron shape, like the Dun Building (oh, also a Green design!). This highly decorative Tudor makes me think of an English garden. The setting is perfect just going into the curve as the street makes its way over to Bidwell. Green had a way of setting buildings just so, on the lots they were to rest, and this is no exception.

I especially love the overhang at the front door, and the decorative detailing above the windows. The windows on the front appear to be original. Love this home!

Below is a photo of the William H. Scott house taken in 1915, when Frederick W. Allan lived in the home. This photo was brought to my attention by reader Bill Blake. Isn’t it fantastic!? Thanks so much Bill!

Hubbell, Mark H., “Home of Frederick W. Allan, 20 Dorchester Road.,” Digital Collections – University at Buffalo Libraries, accessed September 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.buffalo.edu/items/show/80308

My Impressions

When I walk over to Dorchester from Bidwell Parkway, I feel like I’m walking into a park. This street has a feeling. A good one. From one end of the street to the other. The center medians filled with plantings and flowers help. But the median is not huge. And I think that keeps the feel cozy and intimate. The neighbors aren’t so far apart that they don’t see each other regularly. I like that.

Here’s an odd observation I made while walking Dorchester. All of the street numbers were new and modern looking. Okay, not all of them. But I would say a good 60% of them are new. Especially between Richmond and Baynes. Just a weird thing I noticed, but I’ll tell you, it made me think that the people on this street are on top of things. If they care enough to replace their old, worn out house numbers, the insides of these homes must be fantastic. It’s all in the details. Just sayin.

I was so happy to finally write about all of these E.B. Green homes on Dorchester. Without men like E.B. Green, Buffalo would not be dripping with incredible architecture like we are. There are others, but Green was one of the best, and certainly the most prolific.

Take a walk on Dorchester Road soon. You’ll forget your troubles for a short while. Everything will melt away and you’ll get that ‘serenity now’ feeling.

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Celebrating Buffalo Gardens

Celebrating Buffalo Gardens

I missed Garden Walk Buffalo this year. Again. It seems that every year on that weekend, something comes up. This year was no different, so I decided to write this post celebrating Buffalo gardens. I mean, I’m out and about all the time anyway. I have always been blown away by the gardens that Buffalonians create. Of course, I have to include the homes in my photos too, because you know I love my Buffalo homes!

Let’s Get Started

I guess the reason I’m doing this post is to show you that even if you missed the garden walk, you can still see some great stuff across the city. And boy did I see a lot of great gardens.

Now, keep in mind that I didn’t head straight for the Garden Walk addresses. All I did was walk around the city for a few hours. You won’t believe how many gorgeous gardens I saw! You can do the same!

This post is turning into a true pictorial. Sit back, relax and enjoy the scenery. Take a look.

Sometimes it’s the window boxes.

Sometimes it’s the lions and their planters.

So pretty!

Fantastic!

Love this house, and the gardens – ooh la la!

Cute!

Again with the window boxes! Beautiful!

Because it’s gorgeous, and I like Sycamore trees!

Sweet!

Chapin bliss!

Wow!

This is fabulous on Bidwell. It’s things like this that make neighborhoods so great!

So much beauty everywhere here.

One of Tim’s favs!

Just lovely!

Pretty in pink!

Love this.

Bet the bees love this place!

When I saw this out of the corner of my eye, I thought it was a cat! Cute!

What could be better?!

I could never put something like this together!

I want to go back for apples when they’re ready! Pie anyone?

This one is all about the pots!

Love the bike!

So pretty!

A symphony of plants!

There are so many of these hydrangea trees (hydrangea paniculata) in the city right now! Must be the “in” thing!

Makes me want to go up and sit on the porch!

This perfection!

One of the Best in the City

I have to showcase this home at the triangle of Bidwell, Potomac and Argyle Park. This is simply amazing.

Love these painted garden posts!

Sweeeeeet!

Imagine taking a walk here every day.

Secret garden out back…the sphere is a water feature that sounds like a tiny babbling brook.

My Impressions

Look, I know that not all of these gardens are the gardens of the Buffalo Garden Walk, or any of the Buffalo area’s many garden walks. This is merely a representation of what you can see everyday walking around Buffalo. Not kidding. These weren’t even half of the photos I took in roughly four hours of hiking around the city. It was very difficult to decide which to include! I will mention that the Elmwood Village was just chock full of amazing gardens this year!

Special kudos to the owners of the home at the entrance to Argyle Park. Your home is absolutely stunning! The perfect amount of flowers to greens. The perfect amount of whimsy too. Your sign says to grow something spectacular. You certainly did that.

Also love the way you welcome people to sit, relax and enjoy your little slice of paradise! Thank you for that.

Listen, nothing transforms a neighborhood like great gardens. It adds to the quality of life in a neighborhood as much as beautiful homes, public art and architecturally beautiful buildings. Green spaces and flowers add a tranquility that we all need in this fast paced world. And there is no end to the creativity a garden inspires in people!

Think I’ll go out a couple more times to see some of the other garden walk areas I missed! Like Amherst, the East Side, Snyder-Cleve Hill, Hamburg, Ken-Ton, Lancaster, and North Buffalo just to name a few.

Take a walk or a drive. Do it soon. Before all of the gardens become overgrown and give way to fall. We live in a beautiful city. Go see it!

Get the Book! There are tons of bonus photos in the book – click the link to see!

The books make great keepsakes, or gifts for family and friends (or yourself!).  Click here or on the photo below to purchase yours!

The creativity at Garden Walk Buffalo is beyond compare. Check out photos of the Garden Walk Buffalo gardens by scrolling through their facebook page. Enjoy!

City Living – Orton Place + St. Johns Place

City Living – Orton Place + St. Johns Place

On a bike ride several weeks ago, a friend mentioned to me that the area around Orton Place was used as a place for traveling circuses! It’s such a densely populated area that I couldn’t believe it.

Of course, you know I went home that day and immediately looked it up to find out more. And he was right! This area of what is now Allentown was used when the circus came to town! As a matter of fact, shortly before the area was sectioned off and developed, PT Barnum brought Jumbo the elephant here from London. This was in the mid-1880s. Wow! Who would’ve guessed?

I decided to take a closer look and I decided to include St. Johns Place too because, well, there’s something about this street that I really like. Giant old city homes, many of which are the Queen Anne or the Shingle Style, each one with a story to tell.

Let’s Start There

At this first one, on the south side of St. Johns Place is this amazing Shingle Style home. I really wish I’d run into the owners here because I’ve admired the colors of this home for a long time, and I wanted the chance to tell them. It’s so Allentown, isn’t it? Most people pick two, maybe three colors when they paint their homes. These people chose four colors, and each one is spot on. And the paint job itself is unique. Just look at that chimney too. Love the whole house.

Twins

Next are a set of twins. And these are fantastic. I’ve never actually seen twins that are this ornate. They’re essentially the same, but with different paint jobs, windows, and finishes. But the same. Look at the upper balcony on the driveway side of the one home (they both have it, but it can only be seen in the one photo). Spectacular. And the pebbled dash on the triangular parts of the peaks. That’s also the same on both homes.

Next, I come to this. You see why I love this street so much? The triple windows in the peak, and the details around them are fantastic, and very unique. The second floor window is also one that makes this Victorian Era home a standout on the block.

In 1900, this home was listed by Gurney & Overturf for sale for $7,200. The ad stated that the property was worth $13,000, and that it was a bargain at that price. In 1900, the median family income in the United States was roughly $450 a year. So you had to be doing pretty well to live on this block. And it shows.

And this, below. Look at the bay window near the peak. Very unusual. I’ve only seen this a handful of times, and these are original. The home itself could use a little attention, but with a clean-up and the right paint, it could be beautiful!

Moving Right Along

This home, below, was built in 1887 for Howard and Jennie D. Bryant. Howard was a writer for the Buffalo Evening News. By 1900, it appears that Howard had passed away, but Jennie still lived in the home with William McNiven, Jennie’s daughter with Howard, Jeannette, and William’s daughter, Agnes.

The home was the victim of arson in or around 2002, but has since been brought back to, and possibly even better than, it’s original state. It is now a two family home, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. This home is stunning.

And These

These three are all similar Queen Anne style homes. On this street especially, I’m noticing how the use of color makes a big difference to a home.

And with that, I’m at the corner of Orton at this Stick Style home. This home reminds me of the Humphrey House in North Tonawanda, but it might be just the colors. But, what a Victorian beauty this home is! The corner lot is perfect for this home too. Really shows it off nicely!

I can’t help but think about what a bit of paint could do here. This home could be magnificent.

Orton Place

As I round the corner, I immediately see this home. I’ve always wondered about it. It’s so different from all the others. Alas, no one was around at this home either. There’s a twin to the lion on the other side of the driveway. Love them.

It’s here (on the corner of Hudson) that I ran into Beth. She was doing some yard work for a neighbor. We chatted for a few minutes, and she directed me to a home a few houses away on Hudson to see the amazing gardens. It’s next door to her own home, and her own lovely gardens. Beth’s is the green one, below. I love it that she was modest about her own gorgeous gardens. Might have to head over to Hudson sometime soon…Beth, thanks for the heads up, and for being willing to chat about the neighborhood!

Back to Orton Place

This is where we start to get into some real beauties (as if we haven’t already!). Love the pop of orange on this front door!

This one, below, was owned by one of the developers of Orton Place, Tellico Johnson, who was related to some of Buffalo’s earliest residents. It’s an absolutely lovely home. I could see myself having tea on the upper balcony in the mornings…

These Three

Again, note how paint and paint colors really affect the way you see a home.

Mike & Calvin

It’s at this next home that I met Mike and Calvin. That’s Mike on the porch. Calvin was camera shy. Not to be confused with regular shy, because he definitely wasn’t that. I took up entirely too much of their time, but I thoroughly enjoyed their company.

Mike owns the home, and Calvin is an old friend who was visiting. Mike told me of how he first moved into the Allentown area over in Day’s Park. He ‘s been in this home on Orton Place about 20 years or so and has witnessed first hand the changes the neighborhood has gone through. All of Allentown really. It could be pretty rough here back in the 70s and 80s. He’s happy here though, and that’s good to see.

Very friendly guys. Mike, your home is wonderful. Thank you both for taking the time to talk to me. It was very Buffalo of you!

Moving Right Along

Next door to Mike is this amazing home. It was built in 1885 for Dr. Thomas H. Callahan. In 1890 it was featured in “Scientific American Architects and Builders Edition”. One of only four homes in Buffalo to receive that distinction.

Below is a photo of how the home appeared in 1890. Stunning. Note the finial at the top of the bell shaped roof of the turret. Also, the trim at the front of the porch which forms an oval, and at the sides, arches. Love that.

Photo Credit: “Scientific American Architects and Builders Edition” – January 1890

And here is the home today. Once again, paint makes all the difference. It completely changes the look of the house! Back in the 1890s, perhaps this was a more staid neighborhood. The bold color choices here fit right in with the Allentown of today. Note the original balustrade on the second floor porch. Unusual and lovely. We’ve lost the oval and the arches. Wouldn’t it be great to see those brought back?

And this one, below. This home was built in 1887 for Sydney Lake, who was the leader of the Plymouth Methodist Church (now The Karpeles Manuscript Museum on Porter Ave). A few things to note here. The curved gable window and the sunburst trim surrounding it and the other window in the rear gable. Also there is colored glass in the windows on the second and third floors. Love the art in the garden, and also the stained glass ‘additions’ to the second floor windows. Wish the owners would have been around when I went by, would love to know more about those. It’s a beautiful home!

These next few are among the best kept on the street. All have their own beautiful details to marvel at.

The trim around the windows is noteworthy!

Note the private porch on the right. And the underground parking on the left. Love this one!

Love, love, love the colors! And that garage!

Let’s Hop Over to Pennsylvania Street for a Second

At this point I’m going to veer off the title streets again and include a couple of things I want to tell you about. The first, is this building, below. I’ve had actual daydreams about this place. Right across from Kleinhans Music Hall. Perfect location for a funky little jazz club that serves delicious homemade pub food, and has all the best music. Before and after concerts at Kleinhans, of course. And that upper patio for outdoor seating! Or how about a good old fashioned honky-tonk piano bar? (Mike and Calvin, there’s a good use of that word! Haha! ) Or a breakfast and lunch place for the neighborhood?

Dear owners, could you please sell it to me for zero dollars, so that I may make one of these daydreams come true? Seriously though, I love old buildings like this one. I wonder what it was to begin with, who spent time here, and what were they like? It’s Bellini’s Bistro right now and their menu looks fantastic. Think I’m going out to dinner soon…

And this house is kitty corner from the bistro. So beautiful! Oh, and note the arches in the porch…lovely.

Back to St. Johns Place

Now let’s head back to St. Johns Place to check out the north side of the street.

Love the details on the peak!

I’d love to see this one, below, get just a little attention. It’s got such great bones! The five ribbon (?) windows in the peak, the arched window on the second floor, and the details between the other two windows on the second floor, and the shingles! This home is amazing!

There’s some work being done here, and I can tell, it’s going to be fabulous when it’s finished. Looking forward to seeing those upper windows at completion! Love the little patio on the second floor too. Looks like an original window to the right of that. I think that because of the way the window opens out from the bottom. And the new paint job is showing off the dentil molding. Wow!

Next is this beauty. My favorite parts? Those upper windows, the simplicity of the porch. And the entryway. It’s very welcoming. Complete with rocker to come in and sit a spell.

The paint makes a huge difference for this home. Love the under the porch detail.

All I can say about this one, below, is wow! Just perfect in every way! The paint colors are spot on, and the execution is flawless. Doesn’t get much better than this!

Grassroots Garden WNY

This is where we come to a sweet little community garden. Love this! And right next door I met Jenny, who is one of the volunteers at this garden. What a little oasis this is! And fruitful too! Without even trying, I saw beets, greens, lettuces, tomatoes, herbs, and a bunch of other things! Sweet!

Below is Jenny in front of her own home. She was picking red currants from the bush in front of her house. Apparently, this is the largest yield she’s ever gotten from this bush. She eats them with her oatmeal in the morning, and also will make jam this summer too! Nice!

Jenny and I chatted about the neighborhood. She loves it here, I think she said she’s been here eighteen years (?). You don’t stay that long unless you like it! Love your house, Jenny. Especially the paint colors and that upper window; so many panes! Thanks for taking the time to talk to me. Appreciate it.

Buffalo Harmony House

And now we reach the last home on the street. And what an interesting home it is! It was designed by H.H. Little, who I first discussed on the blog over on Norwood Ave. It was built for Dr. and Mrs. Hubbard A. Foster and they moved in sometime in 1887. They lived there with their daughter Florence. Eventually Florence married and had a son, they lived in the home as well.

After the Fosters moved out, the Boocock family moved in. William Boocock was a clergyman with First Presbyterian Church. By 1930, the house was owned by Sarah Doxey, and was a two family home.

What is it Now?

It became a boarding house shortly after that, went through several owners, and was left empty for several years. Holly Holdaway bought the home, and along with Daniel Culross, lovingly restored it into the Buffalo Harmony House Historic Bed & Breakfast.

I first met Holly in 2018 when they were just opening up the B & B. She gave me a tour of the home, and it is fantastic! I took tons of photos, which I, of course, lost. (This was before my blogging days so it was before I was forced to be a little more organized about my photos.) Anyway, I spoke to Holly again the other day when she confirmed the B & B has made it through the pandemic and as a matter of fact, they will be expanding this fall. They’ll be opening a lounge with a full bar in the basement level of the home. Look for signage to come!

The stained glass transom window just inside the home inspired the theme of the B&B, and the names of the guest rooms. The Bluejay Billet, Cardinal Canton, Hummingbird Haven, Sparrow Suite, and Robin Room. Sweet. And I believe the floors have been redone since I was there, and they look fantastic.

Listen, I don’t often do this, but Holly and Dan have put their hearts and souls into this place. So have other owners of B & Bs in the area. If you’ve got friends or family coming to town, why not suggest they stay at one of our locally owned B & Bs? This one’s fantastic!

My Impressions

Wow! All of this from a bike ride and a friend telling me about this area being used for traveling circuses before the homes were built! These two streets are seemingly sleepy little streets. But there’s a lot of history here, and there’s a lot going on now. Symphony Circle and Kleinhans Music Hall is just around the bend, and in the other direction, but just as close is the hustle and bustle of Allen Street! There, you’ll find bars, restaurants, shops and galleries galore.

And just like every neighborhood I visit, there are amazing homes. And people. It’s always about the people in the end. I met several on these two streets. Jenny, Beth, Calvin, Mike and Holly (again). It was really nice meeting you all, and I hope to see each of you again soon.

Historic Allentown has always been, and always will be, one of Buffalo’s most popular areas. To live, to eat, to see a play, to visit a gallery, to party. And Orton Place and St. Johns Place are among the best streets in the neighborhood. Take a walk. Go see them. You’ll love what you see.

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